Risks of Feeding Your Child Solids Too Early

 

When Should Babies Start Eating Solid Food?

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Real Questions What are the dangers of switching over to solid food too soon?

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Introducing solid food before your baby reaches 4 months of age raises the risk of increased weight gain and obesity, both in infancy and later in early childhood. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advocates waiting until your baby is at least 6 months old to introduce solids, and definitely not introducing solid food before the age of 4 months. Physicians’ groups settled on the 6-month cut-off after earlier research determined that children who get solid food at too early might be at a greater risk for developing chronic diseases, such as. There are good reasons why we say wait until the 6-month age to begin giving your baby solid food: Solid foods aren’t as nutritious as breast milk or formula. Solid food can be lower in good nutrition and higher in calories, which can cause obesity.

Solid foods are harder to swallow. Why 6 months of age is ideal for beginning solids. Your baby shows an interest in food others are eating.

Your baby sits up with little or no support. Your baby holds her head up. Your baby picks up soft foods. Your baby puts those foods in her mouth.

Your baby keeps her tongue in the bottom of her. In fact, feeding solids too early can lead to problems with food allergies, pulmonary difficulties (from inhaling tiny bits of cereal into their lungs), constipation and other tummy troubles. Some experts also worry that starting solids too soon might contribute to obesity later in life because a baby learns to take in calories that she doesn’t need. In addition, infants under six months haven’t had the chance to fully develop the diversity of gut bacteria needed to safely process solid food.

This can lead to a number of gastrointestinal. Starting your baby on solid food before 4 months introduces food when your baby’s immune and digestive systems aren’t fully equipped to properly process food and defend against potential allergens. Giving your baby solid food too soon has been linked to a higher risk of obesity and diabetes, according to the study. Also, “starting infants. Waiting too long might: Slow a baby’s growth Cause iron deficiency in breast-fed babies Delay oral motor function Cause an aversion to solid foods. One is that the early introduction of solid foods has been linked to a shorter duration of breast -feeding.

Early solid food consumption has.

List of related literature:

Although some babies take quickly to baby-led weaning and never have a single spoonful of puree, others aren’t ready to eat finger foods at 6 months and remain dependent on breastmilk or formula.

“Baby to Toddler Month by Month” by Simone Cave, Caroline Fertleman
from Baby to Toddler Month by Month
by Simone Cave, Caroline Fertleman
Hay House, 2011

Although a baby may do these things at five months or so, it’s generally best to put off giving solids until the baby is six months old, when his digestive system is more likely to be nutritionally ready for them.

“The Nursing Mother's Companion” by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
from The Nursing Mother’s Companion
by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
Harvard Common Press, 2005

Adding solid foods or infant formula before about 6 months of age may interfere with iron uptake in the breastfed infant and saturate the ironbinding capacity of lactoferrin,increasing the risk of gastrointestinal disease.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

It’s probably best to limit solid meals to no more that two a day until the baby is six months old, because breast milk or formula is so important for the baby’s nutrition in the early months.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care: 8th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care: 8th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
Gallery Books, 2004

Artificially fed infants who start solid foods at 5 months have a significantly higher body mass index at 6 years of age than children who were exclusively breastfed at 5 months (Imai et al., 2014).

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Bringing on the solids too soon can also undermine future eating habits (baby may reject the cereal initially simply because he or she isn’t ready, then may reject it later because of prior parental pushing).

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Adding solid foods or infant formula before about 6 months of age may interfere with iron uptake in the breastfed infant and saturate the iron-binding capacity of lactoferrin, increasing the infant’s risk of GI disease.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Introduction of solids should not be delayed for much longer than 6 months, especially for breast-fed infants, because this is typically when micronutrient stores have been depleted and dietary supplementation with solid foods is needed.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2019” by Rick D. Kellerman, David Rakel
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2019
by Rick D. Kellerman, David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

However, current medical advice is to avoid the introduction of solid food until the baby is 6 months old in order to minimise early contact with potential dietary allergens.

“The Complementary Therapist's Guide to Conventional Medicine E-Book: A Textbook and Study Course” by Clare Stephenson
from The Complementary Therapist’s Guide to Conventional Medicine E-Book: A Textbook and Study Course
by Clare Stephenson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

A month or two later, when your baby has learned that solid foods can ward off starvation just as well as milk, you can experiment with moving the solids up to the middle or the beginning of the meal.

“Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition” by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
from Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care: 9th Edition
by Benjamin Spock, Robert Needlman
Pocket Books, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I think it’s dumb we have to tell people that milk doesn’t process well in babies. No shit. It’s not human milk. And all animals have different milk production. Do we really have that big of an issue to warn people? Really??