Respiratory system Distress Syndrome (RDS) in Premature Babies

 

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Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS)

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Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome (NRDS)

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Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Newborn Duke University

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Respiratory Distress Syndrome #RDS #HMD

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Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a common problem in premature babies. It can cause babies to need extra oxygen and help with breathing. RDS occurs most often in babies born before the 28th week of pregnancy and can be a problem for babies born before 37 weeks of pregnancy. RDS typically gets worse over the first 2 to 3 days. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a common problem in premature babies.

It can cause babies to need extra oxygen and help with breathing. RDS occurs most often in babies born before the 28th week of pregnancy and can be a problem for babies born before 37 weeks of pregnancy. RDS typically gets worse over the first 2 to 3 days.

Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a common breathing disorder that affects newborns. RDS occurs most often in babies born preterm, affecting nearly all newborns who are born before 28 weeks of pregnancy. Less often, RDS can affect full term newborns. Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) is the most common lung disease of premature infants. RDS occurs in babies with incomplete lung development.

The more premature the infant, the greater likelihood of RDS. RDS is due to insufficient surfactant in the lungs. Respiratory pathology is one of the commonest consequences of preterm birth 1 manifesting early as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), a product of structurally immature lungs and pulmonary.

The most common lung problem in a premature baby is respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This was previously known as hyaline membrane disease (HMD). A baby develops RDS when the lungs do not.

Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is when the neonate has difficulty breathing due to surfactant deficiency at birth. RDS, also known as hyaline membrane disease (HMD), is the dominant clinical problem faced by preterm infants and is directly related to structurally immature and surfactant deficient lungs. Late preterm infants (34–36 weeks’ gestation) remain a population at risk for apnea of prematurity (AOP). As infants affected by respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) have immature lungs, they might also have immature control of breathing.

Our hypothesis is that an association exists between RDS and AOP in late preterm infants. As management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) advances, clinicians must continually revise their current practice. We report the fourth update of “European Guidelines for the Management of RDS” by a European panel of experienced neonatologists and an expert perinatal obstetrician based on available literature up to the end of 2018.

Infantile respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS), also called respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, or increasingly surfactant deficiency disorder (SDD), and previously called hyaline membrane disease (HMD), is a syndrome in premature infants caused by developmental insufficiency of pulmonary surfactant production and structural immaturity in the lungs.

List of related literature:

This leaves the late preterm infant at risk for respiratory disorders, including transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), and respiratory failure (Engle et al., 2007).

“Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: Fifth Edition” by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Judy Wright Lott, DSN, RN, BC-NNP, FAAN
from Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: Fifth Edition
by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Judy Wright Lott, DSN, RN, BC-NNP, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) Inability of newborn, especially preterm newborn, to maintain adequate respiratory effort, resulting from insufficient surfactant in the lungs.

“Leifer's Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book” by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
from Leifer’s Introduction to Maternity & Pediatric Nursing in Canada E-Book
by Gloria Leifer, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Most frequently, however, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) relates to respiratory compromise caused by surfactant deficiency and an immature respiratory system, which is most prevalent in the lower gestational age group infants (24–28 weeks of gestation).

“Emerging Topics and Controversies in Neonatology” by Elaine M. Boyle, Jonathan Cusack
from Emerging Topics and Controversies in Neonatology
by Elaine M. Boyle, Jonathan Cusack
Springer International Publishing, 2020

Several studies have consistently shown that late preterm infants have higher respiratory morbidity and mortality, with increased risk of TTN, RDS, PPHN, and respiratory failure than term infants.

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and transient tachypnea of the newborn (retained fetal lung fluid) are more commonly seen in IDMs than age-matched controls [1].

“Neonatology: A Practical Approach to Neonatal Diseases” by Giuseppe Buonocore, Rodolfo Bracci, Michael Weindling
from Neonatology: A Practical Approach to Neonatal Diseases
by Giuseppe Buonocore, Rodolfo Bracci, Michael Weindling
Springer Milan, 2012

Respiratory distress in the newborn can result from a number of causes, including respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN), pneumonia, meconium aspiration syndrome, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and congenital cardiopulmonary malformations.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

It rarely occurs in premature babies; in these pts, respiratory difficulty is more likely to be premature lung disease or respiratory distress syndrome (RDS).

“SOAP for Pediatrics” by Michael A. Polisky, Breck Nichols
from SOAP for Pediatrics
by Michael A. Polisky, Breck Nichols
Blackwell Pub., 2005

Premature infants, particularly those born before 28 weeks, have immature alveoli with fewer type II cells so they are vulnerable to RDS, which is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in this group.

“Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book” by Jane Coad, Kevin Pedley, Melvyn Dunstall
from Anatomy and Physiology for Midwives E-Book
by Jane Coad, Kevin Pedley, Melvyn Dunstall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is common in preterm infants and is caused by lack of surfactant in underdeveloped lungs.

“Faust's Anesthesiology Review E-Book” by Mayo Foundation for Medical Education
from Faust’s Anesthesiology Review E-Book
by Mayo Foundation for Medical Education
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The terms respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and hyaline membrane disease are most often applied to this severe lung disorder, which not only is responsible for more infant deaths than any other disease but also carries the highest risk in terms of long-term respiratory and neurologic complications.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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12 comments

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  • How are you so awesome!..Aaah…. whenever I watch your explanation in a particular subject….I fell in love with that subject….and you got such a great sense of humour…..You helped me a lot to love medical school ��

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  • Hey medicosis, a doubt… slide at 7:41. If the baby does Rapid Shallow breath then shouldnt the carbon dioxide wash outside more and cause alkalosis?

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  • Hi mam.. Am a twin mother(boys).My babies are preterm. 30 weeks 4 days of gestation. We wr at neonatal care fr 25days and now dy r fine we are back hme. Bt weight is less den 1.8kgs… day by day dy r inceasing in terms of weight.. When dy are at nicu dy did nt get any respiratory problems or dy wr not kept in the incubator. On 1st they were kept on cpap aft tat 24days dy wr in warmer. Now at present we at at home from 16days.. Am giving both mother milk nd formula milk(pre nan). Am using palada to feed babies can i use feeling bottle nw(BPA free and anti colic)

  • Hello! I am a mother of 4 days old infant. My baby is a boy and he was born premature. I was at my full term 38+ weeks and his growth was slow for almost 2 weeks at the time of his birth he was 35+ weeks old with birth weight of 2.3 kg. I had gestational diabetes and my doctor advised me to infuse 4 dose of dexa two days before my emergency c section. The doctor advised me for emergency c section because of abnormal CTG of my baby. After birth my baby also inhaled his meconium. Now he is in nursery for 4 days and he is suffering from pneumonia, fever and abnormal heart rate. Please guide me what case does he falls in and what should be the most appropriate treatment.

  • Not only was the explanation super clear, but the added case study at the end helped so much in testing my understanding. Thank you!

  • My baby is suffering from the same situation which is making me feel depressed and he has been on nicu for 4days. I feel like dying

  • Great video! You explained it very clearly!
    I just started my own medical youtube channel, and I also made a video on respiratory distress.
    However I still find it hard to find the balance between informational content and a fun way to explain it.
    You do this in a very natural way, which inspired me to make my videos more visual.

    Thanks for all the knowledge and keep it up!