Reducing the chance of SIDS inside your Nursery

 

Prevent SIDS/SUIDS: ABCs of Safe Sleep

Video taken from the channel: Arkansas Children’s


 

Reducing the Risk of SIDS in Childcare

Video taken from the channel: Pamela McKimie


 

Reducing the risk of SIDS

Video taken from the channel: Eugene Pediatric Associates


 

Six Ways to Reduce the Risk of SIDS

Video taken from the channel: Bon Secours St. Francis Health System


 

Breastfeed Your Baby to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Segment 2 with Audio Descriptions)

Video taken from the channel: NICHDVideos


 

Breastfeed Your Baby to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Segment 2)

Video taken from the channel: NICHDVideos


 

Breastfeed Your Baby to Reduce the Risk of SIDS (Segment 3)

Video taken from the channel: NICHDVideos


After the Baby is Born: Do not fall asleep with your baby in your bed. If you breastfeed, be sure to place baby back in his crib before dosing off. Do not allow the baby to sleep with other children. Babies should never bed-share with children or adults.

Use a bare crib with a firm mattress. Put. Proper prenatal care is not only important in ensuring a smooth pregnancy, it also protects your baby’s health by reducing the risk of a premature birth or low birth weight (both of which are risk factors for SIDS). Don’t smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs during pregnancy. Smoking during pregnancy is a risk factor for SIDS.

Some of your smallest patients, babies younger than 1 year of age, are at risk for SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death. But there are ways to reduce the risk. This continuing education (CE) activity explains the latest research on SIDS, other sleep-related causes of infant death, and ways to reduce the risks of these types of. • Protect the children for whom you care by creating a safe sleep environment to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) and other sleep-related infant deaths • Promote the Safe to Sleep message in child care programs • Raise awareness and. Steer Clear of Products That Claim to Reduce the Risk of SIDS It’s best to avoid any product that says it can lower your baby’s risk of SIDS, because they haven’t been proven safe or effective.

He should sleep in his own crib or bassinet (or in a co-sleeper safely attached to the bed), but shouldn’t be in his own room until he is at least 6 months, better 12 months. This is because studies have shown that when babies are close by, it can help reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. Oct.

6, 2008 Young infants who sleep in bedrooms with fans have a lower risk of sudden infant death syndrome than babies who sleep in less well-ventilated rooms, new research shows. How a Fan in a Baby’s Room Lowers the Risk of SIDS While there is no evidence suggesting that a fan in a baby’s room can lower the risk of SIDS, certain factors that lead to SIDS are lowered. One of the major reasons behind Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), is the lack of ventilation in the child’s nursery. Soft objects and mattresses can lead to suffocation and increase the risk of SIDS, so ensure your baby sleeps on a firm surface free from potential hazards.

Room-share with your infant. Sleeping in the same room as the infant (or having someone else in there) reduces. Reducing the Risk of SIDS and SUID in Early Education and Child Care ​ The AAP provides a free online learning module for early education and child care providers regarding safe sleep.

You can learn more about this free course here.

List of related literature:

• Expand the national campaign to reduce the risks of SIDS to include a major focus on the safe sleep environment and ways to reduce the risks of all sleep-related infant deaths, including SIDS, suffocation, and other accidental deaths.

“Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences” by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
from Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences
by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
Elsevier Science, 2014

There are many environmental factors that increase the risk of SIDS, including tummy sleeping, sleeping on soft or loose bedding or with pillows or toys, exposure to tobacco smoke, and being overheated.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Parents need to know that certain sleep environments (prone sleeping, tobacco smoke exposure, soft bedding, noninfant bed surface, use of certain drugs by the individual sharing the bed with the infant, and thermal stress) can increase the risk for SIDS.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Another risk factor for SIDS is the covering of the infant’s head by bedding.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Avoid allowing the infant to sleep in a prone position, overheating the infant, or letting the infant sleep with another person; provide a firm sleeping surface; allow no loose blankets, pillows, or stuffed toys in the infant’s bed; avoid smoking during or after

“Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Thus the reduction in SIDS deaths associated with changes in sleeping practices has strengthened the association of SIDS with these other risk factors.

“Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation” by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
from Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation
by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Avoid having the infant sleep in a prone position, overheating the infant, or letting the infant sleep with another person; provide a firm sleeping surface; allow no loose blankets, pillows, or stuffed toys in the infant’s bed; avoid smoking during or after pregnancy.

“Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Thus the recent reduction in SIDS deaths associated with changes in sleeping practices has strengthened the association of SIDS with these other risk factors.

“Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation” by John M. Graham
from Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation
by John M. Graham
Saunders/Elsevier, 2007

With the reduction in the incidence of infants being put to sleep prone, maternal smoking has become the major modifiable risk factor for SIDS [Horne et al., 2002].

“Swaiman's Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice” by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, Donna M Ferriero, Nina F Schor
from Swaiman’s Pediatric Neurology E-Book: Principles and Practice
by Kenneth F. Swaiman, Stephen Ashwal, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

If all smoke exposure could be eliminated, it is estimated that one-third of SIDS cases could be prevented.

“Handbook of Forensic Medicine” by Burkhard Madea
from Handbook of Forensic Medicine
by Burkhard Madea
Wiley, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I lost 2 baby niece’s to this and both were different. Melanie was 11 weeks and 2 days old, found dead in the cot, that was my brother’s daughter. Then Rebecca who was 8 months old who died whilst asleep on the sofa my sister’s daughter, both were healthy babies and no one smoked! So how can you say Oh it’s this and that when you really don’t know the answer. I cannot believe that you can do this and that it will PREVENT DEATH……..well why did I lose two perfectly healthy niece’s? ��

  • Thank you! People need to stop using the word Prevent. All you can do is lower risks, but even if you do everything right, your child can still die. Ours did.

  • SIDS is NOT suffocation. Although I agree it is extremely important to follow the safe sleep guidelines, they DO NOT prevent SIDS. I would think a healthcare institution would know better.