Premature Birth Details and Statistics

 

Preterm Birth Babies have a High Risk for ADHD

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Zulfiquar Ahmed


 

#1 Cause of Infant Death Facts About Premature Birth

Video taken from the channel: PreTRM


 

Finding the reasons for premature birth

Video taken from the channel: Tommy’s


 

Preterm Birth Facts How are you training to prepare for premature births?

Video taken from the channel: Laerdal Medical AS


 

California residents talk about how premature birth has affected their lives

Video taken from the channel: UC San Francisco (UCSF)


 

Did you know? 7 facts about premature babies

Video taken from the channel: Babyology


 

Einstein On: Premature Babies, Dr. Judy Aschner

Video taken from the channel: Albert Einstein College of Medicine


Despite this success, the preterm birth rate rose for the fourth year in a row in 2018, and 1 in 10 babies (10%) was born too early in the United States. Additionally, racial and ethnic differences in preterm birth rates remain. For example, in 2018, the rate of preterm birth among non-Hispanic black women (14%) was about 50% higher than the rate of preterm birth. Prematurity is the term used to describe all babies born before 37 weeks of pregnancy. In the UK, a baby is generally considered viable if it is born at 24 weeks, yet their chances of survival is only 50%.

Babies who are born too soon face many challenges. Premature (or preterm) babies are born too soon before 37 completed weeks of gestation. In 2001, the preterm birth rate was 11.9%, reflecting more than 476,000 newborns and the highest rate ever reported for the U.S.

This represents 1 in 8 babies in the U.S. born prematurely. Their website is brimming with premature birth statistics. Did you know these facts?

Across 184 countries, the rate of preterm birth ranges from 5% to 18% of babies born. Preterm is defined as babies born alive before 37 weeks of pregnancy are completed. Premature birth and its complications are the largest contributors to infant death in the U.S. according to March of Dimes 2018 Premature Birth Report Card. Here are the facts. Preterm birth is when a baby is born too early, before 37 weeks of pregnancy have been completed.

In 2018, preterm birth affected 1 of every 10 infants born in the United States. Preterm birth rates decreased from 2007 to 2014, and CDC research shows that this decline is due, in part, to declines in the number of births to teens and young mothers. The March of Dimes, which works both preventing premature birth and assisting babies born prematurely, has raised a lot of awareness about the importance of every day spent in the womb.

With campaigns like A healthy baby is worth the wait, they hope to enable at risk moms to get the health care they need to carry their babies longer. Pinpointing that date is complicated and many factors affect premature infant survival and the possibility of impairments or disabilities after birth. Age of Viability Although it continues to be an ethical dilemna and varies based on what part of the world a baby is born, most doctors define the age of viability as being about 24 weeks of. Another shocking fact according to the March of Dimes is that premature birth is the number one cause of death of newborn babies.

Almost 550,000 premature babies are born each year and they cost 10 times more than the healthier babies. You know why premature babies cost more than healthy babies?33.90% of extremely premature births that occur before 28 weeks will die within the first few days of life in the developing world, while just 10% of babies at this gestation period die in higher income settings.

34.50% of premature babies born before the 26th week of gestation are disabled, a quarter severely so.

List of related literature:

Premature girls are 1.7 times more likely to make it than premature boys, and African American premature girls are more than twice as likely as white males to survive, according to American doctors who followed the progress of 5,076 low-birth-weight babies.”

“The Sexual Paradox: Men, Women and the Real Gender Gap” by Susan Pinker
from The Sexual Paradox: Men, Women and the Real Gender Gap
by Susan Pinker
Scribner, 2008

The Preterm Prediction Study: can low risk women destined for spontaneous preterm birth be identified?

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

A recent study performed using California birth records including 3,820,826 nonanomalous singleton births dated by menstrual age found a similar trend, with an increased risk of stillbirth as pregnancy progressed after 39 weeks, with the highest risk at 42 weeks.43

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Until 2017, the CDC’s website included an infographic depicting a white woman, identifying the risk factors associated with preterm or premature birth (Figure 1.1).

“Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth” by Dana-Ain Davis
from Reproductive Injustice: Racism, Pregnancy, and Premature Birth
by Dana-Ain Davis
NYU Press, 2019

Researchers found that women living in Sderot gave birth to more babies born preterm and at low birth weight, confirming the hypothesis that stress in pregnancy increases adverse birth outcomes (Wainstock et al. 2014).

“Handbook of Life Course Health Development” by Neal Halfon, Christopher B. Forrest, Richard M. Lerner, Elaine M. Faustman
from Handbook of Life Course Health Development
by Neal Halfon, Christopher B. Forrest, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Martius JA, Steck T, Oehler MK, et al: Risk factors associated with preterm (<37+0 weeks) and early preterm birth (<32 + 0 weeks): Univariate and multivariate analysis of 106,345 singleton births from the 1994 statewide perinatal survey of Bavaria.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, Jay D. Iams, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Lesley Frazier
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

There are also many other factors that increase your risk of stillbirth, such as smoking in pregnancy, very high BMI, and low socioeconomic status, which cannot necessarily be separated out from going past your due date.

“The Positive Birth Book: A new approach to pregnancy, birth and the early weeks” by Milli Hill
from The Positive Birth Book: A new approach to pregnancy, birth and the early weeks
by Milli Hill
Pinter & Martin Ltd, 2017

In 40% of these cases there’s no apparent reason for the early arrival, while in the remaining 60% the premature birth is triggered by conditions affecting the mother, the baby, or the placenta.

“The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything in Between” by Ann Douglas
from The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything in Between
by Ann Douglas
Wiley, 2009

Fact sheets: birth defects, miscarriage, and stillbirth; leading categories of birth defects; and perinatal profiles: statistics for monitoring state maternal and infant health; 2001.

“Narcolepsy: A Clinical Guide” by Meeta Goswami, Michael J. Thorpy, S.R. Pandi-Perumal
from Narcolepsy: A Clinical Guide
by Meeta Goswami, Michael J. Thorpy, S.R. Pandi-Perumal
Springer International Publishing, 2016

Premature births pull the average down; late ones would push it up, but we physically intervene to stop babies being more than two weeks late.

“The Tiger That Isn't: Seeing Through a World of Numbers” by Andrew Dilnot, Michael Blastland
from The Tiger That Isn’t: Seeing Through a World of Numbers
by Andrew Dilnot, Michael Blastland
Profile, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

1 comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Lοοk up “Mαvοkοz ddα” οn Gοοɢιε, αn itεm I`vε rεcεntly bεεn mαking usε οf αs guidεbοοk mεthοd tο εαrly εjαculαtiοn. I`vε gοnε frοm thε usuαl 2 minutεs tο nοw lαsting αn αvεrαgε οf Fiftεεn minutεs, αftεr wεεk 4. My lοvεr αnd I usuαlly triεs αn hοur lαtεr if shε’s nοt hαppy with Fiftεεn minutεs.