Positional Plagiocephaly

 

“Mgmt of Deformational Plagiocephaly in Infants” by Michele DeGrazia

Video taken from the channel: OPENPediatrics


 

Exercises for babies with plagiocephaly

Video taken from the channel: The University of Melbourne


 

Plagiocephaly and its treatment | Boston Children’s Hospital

Video taken from the channel: Boston Children’s Hospital


 

How Plagiocephaly Can be Treated & Prevented Mayo Clinic

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

What is Positional Plagiocephaly or Flat Head Syndrome?

Video taken from the channel: London Orthotic Consultancy


 

Dr. Chad Perlyn Explains Positional Plagiocephaly

Video taken from the channel: Nicklaus Children’s Hospital


 

Positional Plagiocephaly or Deformational Plagiocephaly Dr. Chad Perlyn

Video taken from the channel: Nicklaus Children’s Hospital


Positional plagiocephaly is a condition in which specific areas of an infant’s head develop an abnormally flattened shape and appearance. Occipital plagiocephaly causes a flattening of one side of the back of the head and is often a result of the infant consistently lying on his or her back. A flat area may develop very quickly over several months. The condition may improve to some extent as the baby grows, but in some cases, home treatment or physical therapy treatment can improve the shape of a baby’s head. Early interventions (based on the severity) are of importance to reduce the severity of the degree of the plagiocephaly.

Diagnosis is most commonly determined through clinical examination. In order to assess the severity of the condition and determine the best course of treatment, practiti. Deformational, or positional, plagiocephaly is when a baby develops a flat spot on one side of the head or the whole back of the head.

It happens when a baby sleeps in the same position most of the time or because of problems with the neck muscles that result in a. But if a baby develops a lasting flat spot, either on one side or the back of the head, it could be flat head syndrome, also called positional plagiocephaly (pu-ZI-shu-nul play-jee-oh-SEF-uh-lee). Flat head syndrome usually happens when a baby sleeps in the same position most of the time or because of problems with the neck muscles. Positional (or deformational) plagiocephaly is when a baby’s head has a flat spot or is misshapen due to repeated pressure to the same area of the head.

Positional plagiocephaly is a fairly common and treatable condition. Positional plagiocephaly, also called deformational plagiocephaly, is the most common type of flat head syndrome. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, it affects up to 50 percent. Plagiocephaly (sometimes called deformational plagiocephaly or positional plagiocephaly) is a very common, very treatable disorder.

It causes a baby’s head to have a flattened appearance. Plagiocephaly develops when an infant’s soft skull becomes flattened in one area, due to repeated pressure on one part of the head. Positional plagiocephaly Plagiocephaly is a disorder that affects the skull, making the back or side of a baby’s head appear flattened. It is sometimes called deformational plagiocephaly.

This pageexplains positional plagiocephaly and what to expect when a child comes to Great Ormond Street Hospital for treatment. Top of head of child with positional plagiocephaly (drawn by Huang MHS) Plagiocephaly (PLAY-gee-oh-SEF-uh-lee) is a flat spot on the back or side of a baby’s head. It is caused by pressure on the bones of the skull before or after birth. This usually happens because of the way a baby likes to lie in their first few months of life. Positional plagiocephaly does not affect brain growth or development.

Early recognition of the problem is important. Regular repositioning of the baby from the flattened side of the skull prevents development of severe positional plagiocephaly. This repositioning can speed up the rounding process, which will help the baby’s head return to normal by age four or five.

List of related literature:

Deformational plagiocephaly tends to present with slightly higher than average cephalic index values.

“AAOS Atlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices E-Book” by John D. Hsu, John Michael, John Fisk
from AAOS Atlas of Orthoses and Assistive Devices E-Book
by John D. Hsu, John Michael, John Fisk
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Positional plagiocephaly is the most common cranial deformity and occurs when the neonate repeatedly rests its head in a particular position.

“The Developing Human E-Book: Clinically Oriented Embryology” by Keith L. Moore, T. V. N. Persaud, Mark G. Torchia
from The Developing Human E-Book: Clinically Oriented Embryology
by Keith L. Moore, T. V. N. Persaud, Mark G. Torchia
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

plagiocephaly (from Gr, sideways þ the head) (wry head) 1.

“Companion to Clinical Neurology” by William Pryse-Phillips
from Companion to Clinical Neurology
by William Pryse-Phillips
Oxford University Press, USA, 2009

In a few districts, plagiocephaly (parallelogram head shape and a persistent flat spot on the back of one side of the head) and brachycephaly (disproportionately wide head with a flat area on the back) were widely observed.

“Canadian Community as Partner: Theory & Multidisciplinary Practice” by Ardene Robinson Vollman, Elizabeth T. Anderson, Judith M. McFarlane
from Canadian Community as Partner: Theory & Multidisciplinary Practice
by Ardene Robinson Vollman, Elizabeth T. Anderson, Judith M. McFarlane
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

This is the most frequent cause of deformational plagiocephaly, which results from progressive occipital flattening when an infant with torticollis is placed in supine position and preferentially turns his or her head to one side (see Fig. 25-1).

“Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation” by John M. Graham
from Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation
by John M. Graham
Saunders/Elsevier, 2007

Deformational plagiocephaly tends to self-correct when the infant attains the vertical posture.

“Current Management in Child Neurology” by Bernard L. Maria
from Current Management in Child Neurology
by Bernard L. Maria
BC Decker, 2009

Distinguishing positional plagiocephaly from unilateral lambdoid synostosis is based primarily on inspection.

“Berman's Pediatric Decision Making E-Book” by Lalit Bajaj, Simon Hambidge, Ann-Christine Nyquist, Gwendolyn Kerby
from Berman’s Pediatric Decision Making E-Book
by Lalit Bajaj, Simon Hambidge, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Plagiocephaly that results from extrinsic forces (rather than craniosynostosis) is referred to as deformational plagiocephaly.

“Plastic Surgery Secrets Plus E-Book” by Jeffrey Weinzweig
from Plastic Surgery Secrets Plus E-Book
by Jeffrey Weinzweig
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Plagiocephaly also can result from torticollis, because the unilateral shortening of the SCM causes the infant consistently to position the head on the occiput contralateral to the tight SCM while unloading the occiput on the ipsilateral side when supine.

“Pathology and Intervention in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation E-Book” by David J. Magee, James E. Zachazewski, William S. Quillen
from Pathology and Intervention in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation E-Book
by David J. Magee, James E. Zachazewski, William S. Quillen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

The side of the plagiocephaly is usually indicated by the bone that has been most flattened by the deforming forces (see Figs.

“Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation” by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
from Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation
by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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