Neonatal Language Terms Utilized in the NICU

 

Neonatal Hypoglycemia

Video taken from the channel: NICU Essentials


 

Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Video Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Video taken from the channel: Brigham And Women’s Hospital


 

Protecting the Brains of Infants with Therapeutic Cooling

Video taken from the channel: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles


 

“Basic Airway Equipment for Intubation” by Traci Wolbrink, MD, MPH, for OPENPediatrics

Video taken from the channel: OPENPediatrics


 

Neonatal Intensive Care Exam Review: Electrolyte Disturbances MED-ED

Video taken from the channel: MED-ED


 

NICU therapy helping preemies thrive

Video taken from the channel: KETV NewsWatch 7


 

NICU Basics: commonly used terminology in the NICU

Video taken from the channel: NICUtraineeportal


“Bagging”: A slang term often used in the NICU meaning, to pump air into the baby’s lungs using oxygen and a rubber bag. This method is used temporarily to help a baby who needs help breathing. “Blow by”: A slang term often used in the NICU meaning, to give a baby a small amount of oxygen through a tube pointed towards the nose. NICU Terms. During your baby’s stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Children’s Health℠, you may hear many new terms that are unfamiliar to you. Here are some of the common ones used in our NICU and their meanings.

If you have any questions always feel free to ask any of our staff. A. NPO: Abbreviation for the Latin words “nil per os” meaning “nothing by mouth.” The infant is not taking any formula. Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA): An open blood vessel near the heart and lungs which is a necessary part of a fetus’ circulation.

A PDA should normally close a. This stands for neonatal intensive care unit. Your baby is getting special medical care. Below are words that you will hear used in the NICU.

BP (blood pressure): A type of measurement. BP is the force of the blood on blood vessel walls. It comes from the Latin phrase “nil per os,” which translates to “nothing by mouth.”. If an infant is having medical issues such as showing digestive intolerances or being prepared for a surgery, NICU staff may decide a baby should have NPO.

Here is a list of terms we use daily in the NICU setting & small (hopefully) helpful description of each. While you are in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit as a new nurse or parent you will hear the doctors & nurses speaking in what seems to be a foreign language. NICU Terms; Common NICU Disorders; Medical Staff Your Baby’s Nurse. a specially trained R.N. (registered nurse) who will deliver nursing care to your baby. The R.N. works 12 hour shifts. Clinical Nurse IV (CN IV) a nurse who oversees and supervises the care given to each baby.

There is usually one CN IV for each shift (day and night). Pharmacy staff consists of a neonatal clinical pharmacist (permanently assigned to the NICU) and decentralized staff pharmacists (individuals rotating through this position). The neonatal clinical pharmacist is primarily responsible for attending patient care rounds as well as providing the team with drug information and pharmacokinetic dosing.

is a term used in NICUs to reduce the stress of the NICU experience on premature babies, including many different practices such as: swaddling, noise levels, skin-to-skin care, Individual Care Plans, parental involvement, positioning for development, expanding visitation policies, lactation support, and music therapy. Links to Information. Phototherapy: Treatment of jaundice by use of special lights on the baby’s skin to breakdown the bilirubin. Pulse Oximeter: A probe that wraps around a hand or foot, connected to a machine, which measures how much oxygen the blood is carrying.

S. Sepsis: Infection in.

List of related literature:

NICU and SCN are two of the more common terms used to describe the two main levels, but these terms are not used universally.

“Dysphagia E-Book: Clinical Management in Adults and Children” by Michael E. Groher, Michael A. Crary
from Dysphagia E-Book: Clinical Management in Adults and Children
by Michael E. Groher, Michael A. Crary
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

• Try to master the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) lingo.

“The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything in Between” by Ann Douglas
from The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything in Between
by Ann Douglas
Wiley, 2009

It is written for pediatric interns and residents, medical students, neonatal nurse practitioners, neonatal nurses, therapists, and midwives who care for newborn babies either on a neonatal unit or with their mothers in the normal newborn nursery (postnatal wards).

“Neonatology at a Glance” by Tom Lissauer, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Lawrence Miall, Jonathan Fanaroff
from Neonatology at a Glance
by Tom Lissauer, Avroy A. Fanaroff, et. al.
Wiley, 2020

For example, the audience for the use of human milk in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) consists of neonatologists, NICU nurses, and other neonatal healthcare professionals.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Neonatal nurses/ midwives working in neonatal units need to have a sound knowledge of the process, science, support and management of expressing and breastfeeding term neonates, to then relate that to the care of sick and/ or preterm neonates.

“Neonatal Nursing in Australia and New Zealand: Principles for Practice” by Victoria Kain, Trudi Mannix
from Neonatal Nursing in Australia and New Zealand: Principles for Practice
by Victoria Kain, Trudi Mannix
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

The neonatal or ill-term baby patient journey for a baby admitted into a tertiary hospital’s NICU is summarised in Figure 3.

“Medical Informatics: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications” by Tan, Joseph
from Medical Informatics: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications
by Tan, Joseph
IGI Global, 2008

In the UK, level III neonatal intensive care units provide care for extremely preterm babies and the sickest term babies requiring all levels of advanced respiratory support and parenteral nutrition.

“Dewhurst's Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
from Dewhurst’s Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
Wiley, 2012

Neonatal also means pertaining to the newborn child.

“Building a Medical Vocabulary: With Spanish Translations” by Peggy C. Leonard
from Building a Medical Vocabulary: With Spanish Translations
by Peggy C. Leonard
Elsevier, 2014

Aseptically pass each neonate to an assistant (seep. 720for neonatal care).

“Small Animal Surgery Textbook” by Theresa Welch Fossum
from Small Animal Surgery Textbook
by Theresa Welch Fossum
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Babies born earlier, or those where the pregnancy has an underlying pathology (e.g. severe pre-eclampsia) with growth restriction, require liaison with an appropriate neonatal unit for a suitable level of care for the neonate.

“Oxford Handbook for Medical School” by Kapil Sugand, Miriam Berry, Imran Yusuf, Aisha Janjua, Chris Bird
from Oxford Handbook for Medical School
by Kapil Sugand, Miriam Berry, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I was born in 1962. Before MRIs. I have mild CP, low vision and some cognitive stuff going on. I had my first brain MRI about 5 years ago. Long story short, I went to many doctors before one Neurologist finally was able to read my scan. It is thought that I had a massive stroke early in my development. My scan shows that I have less than half of my brain. Thanks to plasticity, however, my brain rewired itself and I went on to lead an almost normal life. I do not have Hydrocephalus but do have a good size swimming hole in my head.

  • Thank you for this. I start my NICU journey in April so this definitely helps to get a headstart on understanding all those acronyms.