Kinds of Breast Protuberances Present in a Breastfeeding Mother

 

What this mom who discovered a lump while breastfeeding wants you to know

Video taken from the channel: Good Morning America


 

Is My Breast Lump Cancer? Fibroadenoma, Mastitis, Intraductal Papilloma, Cyst Types of Breast Lumps

Video taken from the channel: Dr Simi Adedeji


 

Breastfeeding could reduce risk of certain forms of breast cancer

Video taken from the channel: News 19 WLTX


 

Unexpected finding: breastfeeding mom discovers lump

Video taken from the channel: Sunnybrook Hospital


 

Young Woman Faces Breast Cancer After Birth of Baby

Video taken from the channel: Stanford Health Care


 

Breast Lumps and Nursing? The Bump

Video taken from the channel: The Bump


 

What to do if you find a lump in your breast?

Video taken from the channel: BMI Healthcare


Types of Lumps in the Breast. 1. Plugged Ducts. If the milk gets blocked in one area of the breast, then you may have plugged milk ducts.

It may be caused due to milk stasis 2. Engorged Breasts. 3. Mastitis. 4. Breast Abscess. 5. Galactoceles (Lacteal cyst or Milk cyst).

Common Causes of Breast Lumps During Breastfeeding. Breast Engorgement. In the initial days of breastfeeding, when the breasts start producing a larger quantity of milk, they may become hard, lumpy Blocked ducts.

Mastitis. Breast Abscess. Galactoceles. Fortunately, most lumps in a lactating mother’s breasts are either milk-filled glands or an inflammation, such as a blocked duct or mastitis. If the lump is tender, it is probably mastitis.

Check out this page for information on treating mastitis. Breast cysts and fibroadenomas. Examples of benign (non cancerous) breast lumps include breast cysts (fluid filled lumps) and fibroadenomas (solid lumps). Cysts and fibroadenomas within the glandular or milk making tissue could have the potential to impede milk flow or cause a blockage in an area of the breast. Lactating breasts do feel lumpier than non-lactating breasts; they contain milk, more blood and also more lymph.

The quantity of milk in the breasts can also differ now and then, which will cause the breasts to feel lumpier at times. During the first few weeks postpartum when breasts are engorged, they will feel especially lumpy. Most of the time, if not caused by a blockage, lumps in a nursing mother’s breasts are galactoceles (benign milk-retention cysts) or by inflammation due to plugged ducts or mastitis. Clogged, blocked, or plugged ducts result when the milk ducts don’t drain effectively, and swelling and inflammation occur. A galactocele is a small cyst filled with milk.

Cancerous breast lumps are fixed and irregular in shape and texture. Hard breast lumps that still move slightly within the breast and are uniform in shape are likely the result of a plugged duct, mastitis, an abscess or a galactocele. A breast lump is a growth of tissue that develops within your breast.

Different types of breast lumps can vary in the way they look and feel. You might notice: A distinct lump with definite borders; A firm, hard area within your breast; A thickened, slightly more prominent area in your breast that’s different from surrounding breast tissue. Breast pumps are used to remove and collect milk from your breasts.

Once collected, the milk can be immediately fed to your baby or stored in breast milk storage bags and containers to be used at a later time. You can use a hand expression technique to remove your breast milk; however, depending on how often you need to express, you may find it easier and more convenient to use a pump. Trauma to the breast can damage the fat cells in the breast tissue, a condition called fat necrosis. The injury can also form a lump in the breast. These types of lumps that follow a significant trauma are not cancerous.

Fat necrosis can also occur at the site of a previous breast biopsy.

List of related literature:

The three most common breast lumps are fibroadenomas, fibrocystic breast changes, and breast carcinoma.

“Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Diagnosis in Primary Care” by Joyce E. Dains, Linda Ciofu Baumann, Pamela Scheibel
from Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Diagnosis in Primary Care
by Joyce E. Dains, Linda Ciofu Baumann, Pamela Scheibel
Elsevier Mosby, 2007

Clinical features of benign breast lumps include: • smooth and mobile (typical for a fibroadenoma, discussed later) • sudden growth of a smooth lump that can be tense or painful (typical for a breast cyst, discussed later) • non‐specific thickening of breast tissue (often seen in fibrocystic change, discussed later).

“Textbook of Surgery” by Julian A. Smith, Andrew H. Kaye, Christopher Christophi, Wendy A. Brown
from Textbook of Surgery
by Julian A. Smith, Andrew H. Kaye, et. al.
Wiley, 2020

The most common breast lumps are caused by a process previously called fibrocystic disease, more recently labeled fibrocystic or fibroglandular changes or benign breast disease.

“Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8” by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, American Association for Cancer Research, William Hait, Donald W. Kufe, James F. Holland, Emil Frei Iii
from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8
by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, et. al.
People’s Medical Publishing House, 2010

The most common cause of pathological nipple discharge is an intraductal papilloma (44%), followed by duct ectasia (23%), mastitis and breast abscess, and breast carcinoma.

“Women's Health in General Practice” by Danielle Mazza
from Women’s Health in General Practice
by Danielle Mazza
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2011

A stereotactic breast biopsy is helpful when a mammogram or ultrasound examination shows a mass, a cluster of microcalcifications (tiny calcium deposits that are closely grouped together), or an area of abnormal tissue change, usually with no lump being felt on a careful breast examination.

“Davis's Comprehensive Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests with Nursing Implications” by Anne M Van Leeuwen, Mickey L Bladh
from Davis’s Comprehensive Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests with Nursing Implications
by Anne M Van Leeuwen, Mickey L Bladh
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

blocked ducts Lumpy areas in the breast are not uncommon – the mother is usually feeling distended glandular tissue.

“Survival Guide to Midwifery E-Book” by Diane M. Fraser, Margaret A. Cooper
from Survival Guide to Midwifery E-Book
by Diane M. Fraser, Margaret A. Cooper
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Lumps The differential diagnosis of a discrete breast mass is: • cyst • fibroadenoma • focus of fibrocystic change or fibroadenosis • fat necrosis (rare) • carcinoma During the examination, the patient needs to point out any lump she is worried about.

“Essential Surgery E-Book: Problems, Diagnosis and Management: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Clive R. G. Quick, Suzanne Biers, Tan Arulampalam, Philip J. Deakin
from Essential Surgery E-Book: Problems, Diagnosis and Management: With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Clive R. G. Quick, Suzanne Biers, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

When assessing a woman with a diagnosis of fibroadenoma, the nurse would expect to find: A. Bilateral tender lumps behind the nipple B. Milky discharge from one or both nipples C. Soft and nonmovable lumps D. Firm, well-delineated, movable lump in one breast

“Study Guide for Maternity & Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Study Guide for Maternity & Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Fibrocystic breast changes are characterized by thickening, lumps, and cysts (fluid-filled sacs) in the breast tissues.

“Pharmacology for Canadian Health Care Practice” by Kara Sealock, Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, Julie S. Snyder, Beth Swart
from Pharmacology for Canadian Health Care Practice
by Kara Sealock, Linda Lane Lilley, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences Division, 2016

Ultrasound can distinguish between solid (often malignant) and cystic (often benign) lumps within the breast.

“Walter and Miller's Textbook of Radiotherapy E-book: Radiation Physics, Therapy and Oncology” by Paul R Symonds, Charles Deehan, Catherine Meredith, John A Mills
from Walter and Miller’s Textbook of Radiotherapy E-book: Radiation Physics, Therapy and Oncology
by Paul R Symonds, Charles Deehan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • My baby isn’t born so I haven’t started to breast feed yet and I found a lump in my left breast by above the nipple. Do you think it’s pregnancy related?

  • mjhy breast mein bhi pain huta ha aur breast ki back side per bhi aur mjhy right side mein kuch mahsoos bhi huta ha but doctor ney kha ka theak ha