How you can Strengthen Your Child Avoid Drama in Junior High School

 

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Don’t Gossip. Gossip is the root of all school drama, and by avoiding it your child may steer clear of a lot of unnecessary drama. 1  Encourage her to say NO to gossip and to resist the urge to pass it along.

6 Reasons Why Kids Spread Rumors or Gossip. If that happens, encourage your teen to do so with respect for both herself and the person she is ending the relationship with. In 4 Steps to Help Your Daughter Deal with Middle School Drama, a helpful mantra is recommended for tweens and teens: create distance with dignity. “No matter what your daughter’s friends are doing—how cold or exclusive they have. Here are five strategies that will help: Turn down the volume on drama. Some kids get an adrenaline rush from playing a central role in.

First, out your hands up with your palms open and out, the universal sign of stop. If a teacher or witness sees this, it looks better then you two with your fists raised at each other, and you look like the victim that you are. If punches start to get thrown, don’t fight back.

Try blocking with your arms that are raised in the air. If your daughter has girl drama that she’s talking to you about, consider it a blessing in disguise. This is your opportunity to teach her how to stop these mean girls – and not become one herself. Read: How to Help Your Daughter with Mean Friends.

1. Acknowledge Her Feelings. No friendship is perfect, but many can withstand occasional flare-ups and even learn from them. Encourage your tween to work through conflicts. 5  Saying, “I’m sorry” can mean a lot at this age, and helps children understand that they are responsible for the way they treat others.

Why is drama so present for our teens and adolescents? The key to understanding drama lies in understanding the teenage brain. Many teenagers are motivated to have healthy social connections with others, and as Ross Greene says, kids do well if they can.If kids can’t (or in this case, can’t even!), something must be getting in their way. Encourage your child to brainstorm, role play and eventually handle the problem herself.

Force your child to stay with or change friends: Talk about the pro’s and con’s of remaining with a certain group of friends. Review qualities of healthy, good friendships. This is a great learning opportunity for your child. Friendship drama.

The very words can make you shudder. Tears, jealousy, hurt feelings, histrionics, he said-she said… Although it’s the last thing you ever want to deal with, you simply can’t ignore it. Because it will dominate the lives of whoever is involved to the exclusion of everything else.

It will throw your classroom into upheaval. It is my “how to” on avoiding drama in middle school or high school! I know sometimes it seems inevitable in the schooling experience, but I’m here to tell you there is a way to avoid it!

Hope.

List of related literature:

As much as possible, try to place particularly disruptive children who are friends in separate groups.

“I Can Problem Solve: Intermediate elementary grades” by Myrna B. Shure
from I Can Problem Solve: Intermediate elementary grades
by Myrna B. Shure
Research Press, 2000

Good drama teaching builds on positive relationships and trusting interaction between teachers and learners.

“Teaching English, Language and Literacy” by Dominic Wyse, Russell Jones, Helen Bradford, Mary Anne Wolpert
from Teaching English, Language and Literacy
by Dominic Wyse, Russell Jones, et. al.
Taylor & Francis, 2013

• Notify school personnel and encourage them to support and expect children’s attendance and intervene to improve any situation related to children’s anxiety.

“Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, Margaret A. Brady, Nancy Barber Starr, Catherine G. Blosser, Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
from Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

During the child’s first few days in a cast or splintbrace, encourage her parents to stay with her as much as possible to calm and reassure her because restricted movement will make her irritable.

“Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice” by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
from Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice
by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2002

Let her know that cliques are most severe during the middle school years and that things will improve.

“The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries” by Michele Borba
from The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries
by Michele Borba
Wiley, 2009

• Avoid loss of recess as a consequence for misbehavior.

“The ADHD Book of Lists: A Practical Guide for Helping Children and Teens with Attention Deficit Disorders” by Sandra F. Rief
from The ADHD Book of Lists: A Practical Guide for Helping Children and Teens with Attention Deficit Disorders
by Sandra F. Rief
Wiley, 2015

When asked how the secondary school could help her child settle in and make friends, one parent stated that they should ‘try and make it more like primary at first and change it gradually … be welcoming and mind them more … get them used to the rules and the timetable’.

“Beyond Educational Disadvantage” by Paul Downes, Ann Louise Gilligan, Institute of Public Administration (Ireland)
from Beyond Educational Disadvantage
by Paul Downes, Ann Louise Gilligan, Institute of Public Administration (Ireland)
Institute of Public Administration, 2007

Observe some drama lessons and note how the teacher uses the classroom, resources, expectations, signals, drama routines, pupil groups, sharing and reflection to provide the foundations for risktaking drama.

“Learning to Teach English in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience” by Jon Davison, Jane Dowson
from Learning to Teach English in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience
by Jon Davison, Jane Dowson
Routledge, 1998

One way is to keep your behaviour aspect constant during early school experience and to vary strategy.

“Learning to Teach in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience” by Susan Anne Capel, Marilyn Leask, Tony Turner
from Learning to Teach in the Secondary School: A Companion to School Experience
by Susan Anne Capel, Marilyn Leask, Tony Turner
Routledge, 2005

Have the child consider the best setting in which to initiate the conversation with the target child; for instance, in class, at recess, in the hallway, in a group with other children or when she is by herself, and so forth.

“Building Social Relationships: A Systematic Approach to Teaching Social Interaction Skills to Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Social Difficulties” by Scott Bellini
from Building Social Relationships: A Systematic Approach to Teaching Social Interaction Skills to Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Other Social Difficulties
by Scott Bellini
Autism Asperger Publishing Company, 2006

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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  • I’m watching this because today people were saying rumors about a teacher getting fired which he isn’t and I asked a girl if it was true and a group of girls where called out because of that and I also got pulled out and.got in trouble for that I was legitimately crying in the class that they put me in for like 10 to 15 minutes I might get a referral or go to ISS plz help

  • Does anyone have advice for me bc my second cousin is my teacher and if I get any drama she will tell my parents and I don’t want anything to happen any advice pls ��

  • That cat is soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooòooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooòoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooòoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooòooooooooooooooooooooooooo cute!

  • Oml today dis chick came back to my school that moved and came back and she’s starting shit on her 2 day back! I almost got Saturday school today

  • Here is my version.
    1. Don’t talk shit
    2. Don’t do stupid shit
    3. Focus less on friends and more on work. You know why? Because after 4 years you will not see any of them again.
    4. If everyone hates you and it is serious, move to a new school or if not so serious, just remember 4 years and you can leave the city and start your life without any of them. People will mature and mind their own buisness like real people do. Everyone will grow up and will not give a shit. 5) Befriend everyone. Even some of the bullies. And if someone is having drama DO NOT step in. Just say fuck em, and focus on YOUR life. Sorry for the bad language and I hope this helps. Oh, and one last thing, if you sort of are forced into the drama by your friends, then be on both sides. On one side of the drama tell them that you are on their side and the other side tell them that you are on THEIR side. You will get respect from both of the sides. Then again try to avoid it as much as possible.

  • What if someones bad talking your friends because they dont know she has an accent? My friend has a partial british accent, she basically has a british accent but also an american accent too, which makes her sound very sassy and dramatic ish but she isn’t ;-;

  • I was that person where like people from different groups asked me stuff about the other one and then uhh they blamed me for all of the drama and then I got a big trouble….

  • I was in fifth grade and I belive our generation of school students won’t start drama bc we’re super chill about eachother and we hang out in seperate groups not caring about anything. oh, and a very few times there is a tiny drama like oh my gosh so and so asked ou so and so…. blah, but after, none of us really talk about it, we’re going to middle school after summer vacation. hopefully none of us deal with drama and if so this could be very helpful.

  • when you have friends that are cool kids and random people come up to me and talk to me and they know me….but I don’t know them��