How you can Buckle Your Son Or Daughter inside a Forward-Facing Vehicle Seat

 

How to Buckle Your Baby Into a Car Seat | Parents

Video taken from the channel: Parents


 

How to install a front facing car seat

Video taken from the channel: UnityPoint Health Cedar Rapids


 

How to Properly Secure a Child in a Front Facing Car Seat

Video taken from the channel: River City Ford Sales Ltd


 

How To Buckle a Toddler or Big Kid in a Car Seat

Video taken from the channel: The Car Seat Lady


 

Forward Facing Child Seat Installation

Video taken from the channel: VirginiaDMV


 

Car Seat Safety: Front-facing Install & Child Placement

Video taken from the channel: City of Stillwater TV


 

Installing Forward-Facing Car Seat with Seat Belt

Video taken from the channel: Buckle Up for Life


That’s why we’re committed to helping parents and caregivers learn the ins and outs of proper car seat safety, including how to properly buckle your child in a car seat. Tighten the Harness Buckle the harness and chest clip then put your hand behind the clip to eliminate slack in the webbing. After outgrowing the forward-facing car seat, use a booster seat until seat belts fit properly.

Once children outgrow their forward-facing seat, they should be buckled in a belt positioning booster seat, in the back seat, until seat belts fit properly. If your child is riding in a forward-facing car seat with a 5-point harness, you should see a strap attached to the back of the seat with a hook on the end. This strap is called the tether, and it should be used anytime the car seat is being used in the forward-facing position. Once your child has graduated to a forward-facing car seat, it’s recommended they remain in it until they reach the height and weight limit of their seat. The key is to follow the label on your car seat.

So, parents, take your time. Advance your child from rear-facing, to forward-facing, to a booster seat, then to a seat belt only when your child is too heavy or tall to meet the requirements of your current car seat. (2) A child at least two years of age or a child under two years of age who has outgrown his rear-facing child passenger restraint system must be secured in a forward-facing child passenger restraint system with a harness in a rear passenger seat of the vehicle until the child exceeds the highest height or weight requirements of the forward. Use the harness slots described in the car seat’s instruction manual, usually those at or below the child’s shoulders.

Place the harness straps over your child’s shoulders. Buckle the harness straps and chest clip, with the chest clip even with your child’s armpits. Forward-facing seats Once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat, your child is ready to travel in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether. Keep your child in a forward-facing car seat with a harness and tether until he or she reaches the top height or weight limit allowed by your car seat’s manufacturer. Children are ready for forward-facing car seats after they outgrow the size or weight limit of their rear-facing seat.

A highway patrol officer will show you how to properly install a convertible. As your child grows, the proper placement of the shoulder straps changes. On rear-facing car seats, the shoulder straps should come through the car seat slots at or just BELOW your child’s shoulders.

On forward-facing seats, the shoulder straps should be at or just ABOVE the shoulders. Right Fit Basic Tip #3.

List of related literature:

Use a rear-facing car seat placed in the back seat until your baby is at least 2 years old or reaches the highest height and weight recommended by the manufacturer.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Infants younger than 2 yr or if less than manufacturer’s weight limit should be placed in the rear seat facing backward; older toddlers and young children can be placed in the rear seat in a forward-facing child harness seat, until it is outgrown.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book” by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, Joseph St. Geme, Nina F Schor, Richard E. Behrman
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics E-Book
by Robert M. Kliegman, Bonita F. Stanton, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Infants and toddlers younger than 1 to 2 yr or if less than manufacturer’s weight limit should be placed in the rear seat facing backward; older toddlers and young children can be placed in the rear seat in a forward-facing child harness seat until it is outgrown.

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set” by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, Joseph St. Geme, MD, Nina F Schor, MD, PhD
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set
by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

All infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car safety seat until they are 2 years of age or until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer or their car safety seat (AAP, 2018b).

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, 2011a) recommends that all infants and toddlers ride in the back seat with a rear-facing-only seat and rear-facing convertible seat until they are 2 years of age or they reach the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer of the car safety seat.

“Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, Patricia Stockert, Amy Hall
from Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Patricia A. Potter, Anne Griffin Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing child safety seat in the back seat of the car until age 2 years or until they reach the highest weight or height recommended by the car seat manufacturer (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2014c).

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In fact, if you’re using a convertible seat, you can—and probably should—keep it rear facing until your toddler reaches the upper weight limit for the seat (for some seats, as much as 30 to 35 pounds) or until the top of his or her head is less than an inch from the top of the seat.

“What to Expect: The Second Year” by Heidi Murkoff
from What to Expect: The Second Year
by Heidi Murkoff
Simon & Schuster UK, 2012

Place an infant in the back seat of the vehicle in a rear-facing child safety seat for as long as possible, up to the height or weight limit of the particular seat you use.

“Auto Repair For Dummies” by Deanna Sclar
from Auto Repair For Dummies
by Deanna Sclar
Wiley, 2011

Infants and young toddlers should generally ride in an infant seat (often with a detachable base) or convertible seat that faces rearward at first, then converts to forward facing once the child reaches a certain weight (35 pounds in the United States).

“Handbook of Traffic Psychology” by Bryan E. Porter
from Handbook of Traffic Psychology
by Bryan E. Porter
Elsevier Science, 2011

As children outgrow a rear-facing car seat at approximately age 2 years, they should move to a forward-facing car seat with a five-point harness.

“Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book” by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
from Health Promotion Throughout the Life Span E-Book
by Carole Lium Edelman, Carol Lynn Mandle, Elizabeth C. Kudzma
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

Add comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *