How you can Breastfeed Having a Nipple Shield

 

Watch this BEFORE you use a NIPPLE SHIELD! How to use a nipple shield PROPERLY when Breastfeeding!

Video taken from the channel: Julianna Styles


 

Medela Nipple Shield Tutorial

Video taken from the channel: Marla Aycho


 

How to Breastfeed without a nippleshield

Video taken from the channel: BITTYLAB®


 

How do I wean my 1 month old off a nipple shield?

Video taken from the channel: IntermountainMoms


 

How to put on a Nipple Shield

Video taken from the channel: Breastfeeding Confidential


 

How to use a nipple shield | do’s and don’ts from a Lactation Consultant.

Video taken from the channel: Kassi Brooke Reyes


 

How to Use a Nipple Shield For Breastfeeding

Video taken from the channel: boober


A nipple shield is a breastfeeding product that’s used in special situations. It’s a very thin, soft piece of rubber or silicone that covers the areola and nipple. A small opening at the tip of the nipple area allows breast milk to flow from your breast, through the shield, and to your baby. Using a nipple shield is pretty simple, and the key is getting the shield into position before latching on your baby. You don’t want to just attach a dry shield to your breast.

The shield adheres. Immerse the nipple shield in warm water for a few minutes to make it more flexible. 3. Rub a little breast milk on the inner part of the nipple shield base to help tighten the seal and minimize chafing. Squeeze a little breast milk into the tip of the shield to trigger the let-down reflex.

Dampen it with breast milk to seal the shield in place. Squeeze out some breast milk or extract onto the nipple shield. Hold your breast with one hand and the baby’s neck and head gently with the other. Bring the baby’s mouth and nose near to the breast and help him latch on to the nipple shield.

A nipple shield is a flexible piece of shaped silicone that moms can place over their nipples during breastfeeding. As described by the name “shield,” it helps to protect the nipple and makes breastfeeding more comfortable. Ideally, nipple shields are for temporary use, with the help and advice of a Lactation Consultant, and used on a short-term basis. Learn how to latch a baby correctly using a nipple shield.

For more information, blog posts, and podcast episodes, check out our website: http://www.sdbfc.com. If one nipple is inverted or very flat and the other sticks out, a baby may prefer the easier breast with the protruding nipple. A nipple shield on the inverted nipple helps some mothers to use both breasts. Alternatively, pumping the side baby refuses can stimulate the milk supply to supplement back to your baby and it may help evert the nipple. A study of 54 mothers and babies compared babies breastfeeding with a nipple shield to those breastfeeding without it and found no difference in weight gain during the first 2 months of life.

1 Although one 1980 study found babies took 22% less milk at the breast with a shield, 2 these mothers used thicker, rubber shields. Nipple shields should not be introduced until milk is flowing Used as a last resort when latching and breastfeeding not improving. Monitor baby’s output and weight gain if breastfeeding with a nipple shield. Moms should pump post breastfeeding if using a nipple shield to ensure the breast.

To use a nipple shield, you’ll first want to make sure it stays securely in place. If you’re having trouble getting it to stay put, apply warm water to the under side before sticking it on your nipple, which can help it adhere better. You might also apply a little nipple cream if the shield still isn’t sticking.

List of related literature:

Moisten the shield with warm water, turn almost inside-out as you apply it to the breast, apply a little breastmilk to the outside of the shield, hand express milk into the shield tunnel, and bring the infant to breast.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician: Using the Evidence
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Moisten the shield with warm water, turn it almost inside-out as you apply it to the breast, apply a little breastmilk to the outside of the shield, hand express milk into the shield tunnel, and bring the infant to breast.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Use breast shells between feedings to make your nipples easier to draw out, but avoid breast shields during nursing, which, though they can draw nipples out, can prevent baby from properly grasping your nipple and sets up a longer­term problem.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Relieve nipple engorgement by applying warm compresses before the feeding, gently express some milk to soften the breast, or lean the breasts into a large bowl of warm water (or take a warm shower) just before the feeding to facilitate milk release and soften the nipples.

“Special Operations Forces Medical Handbook” by Department of Defense
from Special Operations Forces Medical Handbook
by Department of Defense
Skyhorse, 2011

Use a nipple shield for entire feedings only if (1) a lactation professional is making sure that the baby is getting enough milk during feedings with the shield, or (2) you use a fully automatic electric pump after each nursing to guarantee that your breasts

“The Nursing Mother's Companion” by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
from The Nursing Mother’s Companion
by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
Harvard Common Press, 2005

Use your free hand to cup your breast in a “C” hold: Place your thumb above or to the side of your areola (but not touching it).

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Thus, mothers need to be shown how to support the breast with the shield in place so that the infant can achieve an effective sucking position while keeping the shield away from the nose.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Use the pads of your middle three fingers to palpate the breast, using rotatory movements gently to compress the tissue against the chest wall.

“Hutchison's Clinical Methods E-Book: An Integrated Approach to Clinical Practice With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access” by Michael Glynn, William M Drake
from Hutchison’s Clinical Methods E-Book: An Integrated Approach to Clinical Practice With STUDENT CONSULT Online Access
by Michael Glynn, William M Drake
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Nurse on the less sore nipple first until there is letdown, then switch the baby to the sorest nipple to empty that breast, then switch back to the less sore nipple to finish the feeding.

“A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing” by Annamma Jacob
from A Comprehensive Textbook of Midwifery & Gynecological Nursing
by Annamma Jacob
Jaypee Brothers,Medical Publishers Pvt. Limited, 2018

Nipple shields should be used only as a last resort because of a 20% to 60% reduction in milk consumption.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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13 comments

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  • So how can an inverted nipple be placed inside a nipple shield? Severely inverted nipples don’t come out, there is nothing to ‘put in’. How would you keep it in place? I know that some nipples will be drawn out by the baby sucking but there are nipples that stay inverted all the time and no amount of stimulation will get them out.

  • I had a positive first time experience using it fir someone who doesn’t have prominent nipples more on the flatter side. Been only able to pump in order for nipple to show but is enlarged. It’s a good alternative to those who cannot normally breast feed.

  • so it’s my first night home with my baby and after about of 1 hour of struggling, i watched your video. i’m typing this one handed because i’ve finally got a happy feeding baby! thank you!

  • sister i also have inverted nipples. my first baby feed formula of this problem. i hope to a another baby is it help full to me feed bm for my baby. thanku. sorry for my english

  • I think the part where you said the nose goes the baby’s bottom lip actually goes so mom and baby get more skin to skin. I believe

  • My son is 4 months he isn’t latching so I switch bottles I’m currently using the Nuk bottle but that didn’t help him latch either would one of these help me latch??

  • I remember that time so well! I had a little problem after my third pregnancy and these things work! It cracks me up how you wave that around while you’re introducing yourself like it’s the most natural thing in the world 😉 I’m guessing you’re a nurse, which my mom was too, and I know they’re just completely matter of fact about the human body.

  • What must I do I have inverted nipples and I tried breast pump and back part of syringe to pull out but I didn’t help me at all

  • My baby won’t latch properly no matter how many times I try. 3 weeks of horrible pain, bloody and bruised nipples will hopefully end now…

  • How many months can we use 1 contact shield? Am using it from past 2 months…I need to chAnge the shield or is it safe to continue..

  • Will this help with fast let down? I’ve tried everything and baby gets so angry when j try to feed him he doesn’t want to nurse it’s killing me

  • My 8 month old and I have been EBF since he was born. He just got his bottom teeth and it’s causing me a lot of pain and even leaving a small wound on my nipples. No matter how I try to position him or how I relatch it is still super painful and it reopens the wound. Would you recommend a nipple shield just until it heals?

  • I have inverted nipples nd ma baby cannot latch on..feeding using nipple sheild causes bleeding of nipples…what should i do?
    I hv pumped for 3 months nd then switch to formula feeding…��