How to handle Postpartum Fatigue

 

Coping with post viral fatigue

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Easy Do’s and Don’ts for Postpartum Adrenal Fatigue

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Heads-Up: Depression Isn’t the Only Postpartum Disorder

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STRUGGLING WITH POSTPARTUM ANXIETY.

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My new baby sleeps very well, but I still have fatigue. Is this normal?

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SLEEP HACKS FOR TIRED PARENTS | HOW TO COPE WITH NO SLEEP | EMILY NORRIS

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Tips to Fight Fatigue After Childbirth | Oakdale ObGyn

Video taken from the channel: Oakdale OBGYN Maple Grove


How to Fight Postpartum Fatigue Seek Rest and Comfort. You’ve probably been told to nap when the baby naps. It’s common advice because it is true. When Get Help. Enlist the aid of your partner, friends, and family to take on housework, laundry, cooking, and caring for Let the Housework Go.

If. Stay hydrated. Dehydration can feel like fatigue. A good rule of thumb for nursing mothers is to drink a glass of water for every feeding. Limit sugary drinks, which may add calories but no nutrition.

Your body is healing. If you’re breastfeeding, your body is also working to produce enough calories to nourish your baby. Help your body Continue Taking Your Prenatals. During the postpartum period your body needs external resources to recover and stay on a Stick To A Healthy Well-Balanced Diet. A healthy diet will be good both for you and your baby.

It will improve your milk Drink Enough Water. If you breastfeed. Fatigue is normal, but being overly tired may signal postpartum depression or physical conditions such as anemia.

Call your doctor if you feel tired, sad or overwhelmed for more than a few days. And remember to talk about your mood and energy level at your postpartum appointment. By Beth Hawkins, Contributing Writer. Even if you have no other complications, it can be hard to cope when you’re this tired. You will need to save your energy, and build it up, so try one or more of the following: Forget about having the perfect house.

Take care of yourself. Yes, you’re busy taking care of your baby, but don’t forget to baby yourself too. Eat right, take naps, drink plenty of water — you’ve lost a lot of fluid during delivery, and dehydration can lead to more fatigue — and most of all, enjoy your baby!

With postpartum OCD, you may have obsessive, recurring thoughts about harm or even death befalling your baby. With postpartum panic disorder, you can have sudden panic attacks related to similar. On the other hand, postpartum depression is a disorder that occurs during the first year after giving birth. Its most common symptoms are excessive feelings of guilt, weight loss or gain, difficulty concentrating, or hypersomnia. How to cope with loneliness after childbirth.

Lack of sleep certainly plays a role, too. Postpartum depression, on the other hand, lingers for much longer. It tends to be more intense, with feelings like persistent sadness, helplessnes.

Talk to your health care provider about ways to save your energy and treat your fatigue. Try activities such as meditation, prayer, yoga, guided imagery, visualization, etc. Eat as well as you can and drink plenty of fluids.

Eat small amounts at a time, if that is helpful.

List of related literature:

During the first 6 weeks postpartum (at least!), push yourself to nap when the baby does, at least once daily.

“Natural Health After Birth: The Complete Guide to Postpartum Wellness” by Aviva Jill Romm
from Natural Health After Birth: The Complete Guide to Postpartum Wellness
by Aviva Jill Romm
Inner Traditions/Bear, 2002

Over time, your fatigue should lessen as your body adjusts to the rhythms of motherhood, you gain experience in dealing with your baby and the baby sleeps through the night.

“Mayo Clinic Guide to Your Baby’s First Year” by Mayo Clinic
from Mayo Clinic Guide to Your Baby’s First Year
by Mayo Clinic
RosettaBooks, 2012

Postpartum fatigue is common during the early days after childbirth, and it

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Deep breathing exercise It should be started on the first postpartum day.

“Fundamentals of Midwifery and Obstetrical Nursing” by Lily Podder
from Fundamentals of Midwifery and Obstetrical Nursing
by Lily Podder
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Sleep and postpartum depression.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Check with your doctor to see if a thyroid supplement would help you during the postpartum (see below).

“The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide, Second Edition: What You and Your Family Need to Know” by David J. Miklowitz
from The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide, Second Edition: What You and Your Family Need to Know
by David J. Miklowitz
Guilford Publications, 2011

Fatigue is common in the early postpartum period and involves physiologic as well as psychologic components.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, Shannon E. Perry
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Preparing as much as possible for the fact that you might not have the same energy levels postpartum can help make the days after giving birth easier, regardless of how tired you actually feel on a day-to-day basis.

“How to Conceive Naturally: And Have a Healthy Pregnancy after 30” by Christa Orecchio, Willow Buckley, Sara Gottfried
from How to Conceive Naturally: And Have a Healthy Pregnancy after 30
by Christa Orecchio, Willow Buckley, Sara Gottfried
Grand Central Publishing, 2015

• Baby journal, birth announcements, reading material, and other things to keep your mind occupied while you’re resting.

“One Year to an Organized Life with Baby: From Pregnancy to Parenthood, the Week-by-Week Guide to Getting Ready for Baby and Keeping Your Fami” by Regina Leeds, Meagan Francis
from One Year to an Organized Life with Baby: From Pregnancy to Parenthood, the Week-by-Week Guide to Getting Ready for Baby and Keeping Your Fami
by Regina Leeds, Meagan Francis
Hachette Books, 2011

While not a true disorder, postpartum blues respond well to support, reassurance, and adequate sleep and resolve by week 3 postpartum.

“Obstetric Triage and Emergency Care Protocols, Second Edition” by Diane J. Angelini, EdD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN, Donna LaFontaine, MD, FACOG
from Obstetric Triage and Emergency Care Protocols, Second Edition
by Diane J. Angelini, EdD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN, Donna LaFontaine, MD, FACOG
Springer Publishing Company, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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5 comments

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  • Your sweater is gorgeous! Where is it from!? Also I totally enjoy these hacks, I’m no where near having kids but I enjoy your videos to much! ��

  • The writing things down before to sleep has helped me rest better and dream less when I sleep. Dreaming bothers me so much because I cannot rest. But since I started writing down all my thoughts or ideas on paper before I sleep it tires my eyes and hand muscles and shoulder and I sleep. So much better.

  • I am a young woman who suffers from depression and eating disorder, and this video just captures almost everything I need to explain to people why I decide to be childfree. Pregnancy and motherhood require more effort than they are thought of, especially when we live in a (still) male-dominant world. People always tell me: you will change your mind some day. As if I am supposed to be able to be a mom and have all the skills and capacity needed to be a mom because I am born female.

  • That thing you do where you imagine everything is heavy is the exact same advice my grandmother gave me when I was little! And I kid you not, that woman can fall sleep any time, anywhere in the blink of an eye!

  • I’m the least productive the first hour of the morning, lol. I have poor focus and mental clarity. I’m really just half asleep at that point. ����‍♀️