How Skin-to-Skincare May Benefit Your Child

 

Skin to Skin Care with parents is safe for tiniest newborns

Video taken from the channel: The Women’s


 

BENEFITS OF SKIN TO SKIN AFTER BIRTH

Video taken from the channel: Alice Turner


 

Skin to Skin with your Newborn

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


 

Skin to Skin with your Baby

Video taken from the channel: Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust


 

Skin-to-skin Contact After Birth

Video taken from the channel: VCU Health


 

Newborn Care: The Benefits of Skin-to-Skin Contact

Video taken from the channel: Bundoo


 

Kangaroo Care: The Benefits of Holding Your Newborn Close

Video taken from the channel: Cincinnati Children’s


Skin-to-skin contact offers several benefits for newborns and their moms: Warmth. Newborns can’t regulate their body temperature well (such as by shivering to keep warm). Your body heat keeps Comfort. Researchers have found that newborns who had more skin-to-skin contact cried less.

Easier. Skin-to-skin beyond the delivery room. Keep cuddling skin-to-skin after you leave the hospital. Your baby will stay warm and comfortable on your chest, and the benefits for bonding, soothing, and breastfeeding will likely continue. If your baby is sleepy, skin-to-skin can help keep your baby interested in nursing.

Dads can snuggle, too. About Skin-to-Skin Care You may be able to hold your baby in the NICU as soon as she is stable and before she is ready to begin feedings. If so, you may be interested in skin-to-skin care, also called kangaroo care. What is Kangaroo Care?

Immediately after birth, there are three steps to take to provide skin-to-skin care for your baby: Have someone place your naked baby on your bare chest so the two of you are nestled chest-to-chest. Turn your baby’s face sideways in a position that keeps the airway open. Remain this way for at least. Kangaroo care shirts can make it easier to go from skin to skin with baby to shopping or even work. The skin to skin T-shirt can also help allow skin-to-skin care while out and about.

They even have one for dads! As we mentioned earlier, the Moby Wrap is excellent for kangaroo care and beyond, but you need to wear something underneath it. Skin-to-skin contact with the baby can be beneficial for all types of births, assuming your baby’s condition is stable, as most full-term babies are at birth. However, this bonding time can be done even after more complex births and for preterm infants. Simply put, through time spent skin to skin with Dad, baby’s body learns to self-regulate, resulting in a regular and stable heartbeat and breathing pattern.

75% of sporadic breathing and slow heart rate episodes are reduced through skin-to-skin contact. The benefits for baby alone are well worth the time spent skin to skin. When your baby feels your skin on hers, her brain releases oxytocin (also known as the “love hormone”), which, in turn, helps stabilize her cardiovascular system, reduces stress and makes her feel more calm and safe. A recent interesting study found that skin-to-skin care increased oxytocin not only in mothers but fathers and infants, as well. Skin-to-skin care also is good for parents and may help you: make more breast milk, the best food for most babies in the first year of life reduce your stress build your confidence that you can take care of your baby feel close to your baby.

Skin to skin contact and Kangaroo Mother Care can contribute much to the care of the premature baby. Even babies on oxygen can be cared for skin to skin, and this helps reduce their need for extra oxygen, and keeps them more stable in other ways as well (See kangaroomothercare.com) (See the information sheet Breastfeeding the Premature Baby).

List of related literature:

Skin-to-skin care may have a positive effect on infant state organization and respiratory patterns, increase the rate of infant weight gain, improve maternal milk production, and have long-term benefits in infant development and parents’ perceptions of their babies (Feldman et al., 2002; Cho et al., 2016).

“Avery's Diseases of the Newborn E-Book” by Christine A. Gleason, Sandra E Juul
from Avery’s Diseases of the Newborn E-Book
by Christine A. Gleason, Sandra E Juul
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

It is important therefore that parents are provided with as much advice as possible with regard to their choice of skin products for their baby.

“Fundamentals of Midwifery: A Textbook for Students” by Louise Lewis
from Fundamentals of Midwifery: A Textbook for Students
by Louise Lewis
Wiley, 2015

Recommendations from a European Roundtable Meeting on Best Practice Healthy Infant Skin Care.

“Harper's Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology” by Peter H. Hoeger, Veronica Kinsler, Albert C. Yan, John Harper, Arnold P. Oranje, Christine Bodemer, Margarita Larralde, David Luk, Vibhu Mendiratta, Diana Purvis
from Harper’s Textbook of Pediatric Dermatology
by Peter H. Hoeger, Veronica Kinsler, et. al.
Wiley, 2019

Skin-to-skin care also supports breastfeeding, which improves nutrition for the premature and sick infant.

“Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care, Sixth Edition” by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Leslie Altimier, DNP, RNC, MSN, NE-BC, Marina V. Boykova, PhD, RN
from Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care, Sixth Edition
by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Leslie Altimier, DNP, RNC, MSN, NE-BC, Marina V. Boykova, PhD, RN
Springer Publishing Company, 2019

The importance of skin care in the newborn is compounded by several factors:

“Hurwitz Clinical Pediatric Dermatology E-Book: A Textbook of Skin Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence” by Amy S. Paller, Anthony J. Mancini
from Hurwitz Clinical Pediatric Dermatology E-Book: A Textbook of Skin Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence
by Amy S. Paller, Anthony J. Mancini
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Phillips (2013), reviewed studies regarding the benefits of early skin-to-skin contact between the mother and newborn.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Davanzo et al. (2015) reported on the prevention of SUPC in healthy term infants in association with skin-to-skin contact soon after birth.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Skin-to-skin care is also recognized as a potential benefit to encourage breastfeeding and to improve maternal attachment behaviour and reduce crying by infants, together with improving cardiorespiratory stability for preterm infants.

“Mayes' Midwifery E-Book” by Sue Macdonald, Gail Johnson
from Mayes’ Midwifery E-Book
by Sue Macdonald, Gail Johnson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

At birth, skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby has positive benefits.

“Perinatal Nursing” by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women's Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
from Perinatal Nursing
by Kathleen Rice Simpson, Patricia A. Creehan, Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nurses
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

Skin care of the healthy newborn.

“Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society® Core Curriculum: Wound Management” by Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society®, Dorothy Doughty, Laurie McNichol
from Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society® Core Curriculum: Wound Management
by Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society®, Dorothy Doughty, Laurie McNichol
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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