How Breastfeeding Affects Your Sex Existence

 

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“Many women’s sex drives change not only after baby, but while breastfeeding too—and for a multitude of reasons.” One of the most basic reasons: Hormone fluctuations. During pregnancy and breastfeeding, the hormone prolactin cranks in order to stimulate your breasts to produce milk. However, lower levels of this hormone may decrease your sex drive. When you are breastfeeding your baby your body experiences lower levels of this hormone.

The lower levels of estrogen are also associated with vaginal dryness, and when you may have sex, it could be painful due to reduced vaginal lubrication. What You Can Do. Yes, breastfeeding can affect your sex drive. Results from a 2005 study found that women who were breastfeeding were more likely to delay resuming intercourse following the birth of their child. Breastfeeding decreases the amount of estrogen that your body produces, testosterone levels are lowered, and it increases the amount of the hormone prolactin, which is a direct cause of reducing sexual desire.

You may feel incredibly fatigued taking care of a newborn, getting used to your tiny human’s needs and preferences. Another way breastfeeding can affect your sex life is by making your vagina way drier than normal. Here’s why: as you’re nursing, your pituitary gland produces prolactin, which signals your breasts to make milk.

It also affects how much estrogen your body produces. And without estrogen, your vagina can become extremely dry. But even after you get the go-ahead for vaginal intercourse, you will find that breastfeeding will affect your sex life the following ways: Dry Vagina.

In order to breastfeed, your body needs to produce a hormone called prolactin, which stimulates the production of milk. Prolactin causes your body to. Both conditions will diminish the pleasure that you feel during sex and could a decrease your libido.

Just because you are new parents does not mean that you should abandon your sex life. You might just wake up one day, you’re a good mom for breastfeeding your baby, he’s healthy, but your relationship is. Prolactin is important for lactation, but is also to blame for your low sex drive. When your baby feeds, you produce more milk and your body suppresses ovulation.

That’s the beauty of your body. 1 of 5 When a woman is breastfeeding, she might develop some sexual difficulties, which may be related to hormonal factors, physical discomfort, fatigue, psychological factors or a combination of all the above. Usually, such issues are temporary and can be addressed. Next question: Is oral sex safe for pregnant women?A: Many new moms aren’t exactly eager to resume sex, and while breastfeeding can be one factor, it’s seldom the biggest one.

Hormonal changes during breastfeeding mean your body’s not producing as.

List of related literature:

Your partner may worry that breastfeeding will reduce his or her opportunity to parent.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Effects of sucking and skin-to-skin contact on maternal ACTH and cortisol levels during the second day postpartum-influence of epidural analgesia and oxytocin in the perinatal period.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Breastfeeding will stimulate the release of oxytocin, which will initiate uterine contractions and thus increase uterine involution and reduce the risk of postpartum haemorrhage.

“Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series” by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
from Joints and Connective Tissues: General Practice: The Integrative Approach Series
by Kerryn Phelps, Craig Hassed
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2012

As your baby increases in muscle tone, breastfeeding will become easier and you’ll be able to relax and enjoy the special closeness of the breastfeeding relationship.

“Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers” by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
from Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers
by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
New Harbinger Publications, 2010

Interest in sex may be reduced, not only by the endocrine environment of lactation but also by maternal fatigue, reduced vaginal lubrication during lactation, and the altered roles of wife and mother.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice” by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, Jay D. Iams, MD, Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM, Thomas Moore, MD, Michael F Greene, MD
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice
by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Breastfeeding also has an effect: ‘Although there are some physiological similarities between sexual arousal and breastfeeding, erotic stimulation and/or orgasm do not usually accompany breastfeeding.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Many, however, are surprised to find that once a smoothly working breastfeeding relationship is established, nursing is stress­reducing rather than stress­producing – the hormones released as baby suckles actually enhance relaxation, and the experience itself is one of the healthiest routes to tension relief.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

The pain and discomfort resulting from episiotomies can interfere with mother–infant interaction, breastfeeding, re-establishment of the sexual relationship with her partner, and even emotional recovery after birth.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Mezzacappa ES, Katkin ES: Breast-feeding is associated with reduced perceived stress and negative mood in mothers, Health Psychol 21(2):187–193, 2002.

“Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig
from Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care
by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Breast-feeding increases sleep duration of new parents.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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6 comments

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  • Cheers for the Video! Sorry for butting in, I am interested in your opinion. Have you considered Tonevi Qendeline Secret (Sure I saw it on Google)? It is an awesome one off guide for stopping erectile disfunction (ED) without the hard work. Ive heard some interesting things about it and my mate after many years got great results with it.

  • I’m experiencing these problems right now. It seems like breastfeeding gives me so much physical intimacy that I just want space from my husband. I had a very high sex drive for the first 5 years of our relationship and marriage and now I dont want the sex. My baby is almost 3 months and it’s been a hard adjustment because i want to want to have sex. Thanks for the helpful video. I sent it to my husband to watch if hes interested in an explanation of my seemingly bizarre change in behavior.

  • Lack of sex makes your husband turn to other women. That’s why keep age difference 8 Years. Example your Age 22 Your husband should be +8. Otherwise maximum time you will cannot fulfill your husband sexual desires.

  • OMG this is so true.. I feel that some of us men get so deprived! Our baby is still breastfeeding after 10 months old & eating solids also & yet still no sex! FML!

  • This was great, thanks, been searching for “how to stimulate libido” for a while now, and I think this has helped. Ever heard of Zenames Yeyila Cure (should be on google have a look )? Ive heard some unbelievable things about it and my partner got excellent results with it.