Have You Got signs of Postpartum Obsessive-compulsive disorder

 

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Signs of Postpartum OCD. A new mother with OCD may focus on things such as: The baby dying from SIDS. Dropping the baby.

The fear of putting the baby in a strange place, such as the microwave or oven. Constant, recurring images of the baby dead. The Basics of Postpartum Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Postpartum Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is not unlike OCD that anyone else may experience; however, its symptoms involve the mother’s thoughts and behaviors specifically towards or about her newborn. Though the recorded rate of postpartum OCD is relatively low, it is a very serious condition that should be. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, overly worried, panicked or feel like you’re losing control — or if you feel any of the symptoms of postpartum depression, anxiety, OCD or PTSD — tell your OB/GYN or your baby’s pediatrician as soon as possible.

The postpartum OCD anxiety symptoms may differ from one to another as these may depend on how a woman thinks. However, the following are some of the obsessive-compulsive thoughts, emotions, and compulsions that you may experience: 1. OCD Thoughts and Emotions. For many moms it’s common to experience a depressive mood called “Baby Blues”, and for many treatment is not needed. Pregnancy or Postpartum (OCD) looks a little different.

A study published a study on postpartum OCD prevention in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, found incidence of postpartum OCD ranges from 2%-9%. Postpartum symptoms of OCD are most likely to occur within six weeks after childbirth but can begin during the pregnancy. In women who have preexisting OCD, there is some evidence that miscarriage can also act as a potent trigger of OCD symptoms. Today, most people are aware of the symptoms related to postpartum depression or psychosis.

However, women are also at risk for developing postpartum anxiety disorders, such as OCD. While research on this condition is fairly limited, studies show that 1-3% of new mothers experience postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Postpartum Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can manifest as symptoms of obsessions, compulsions, or both, and often interferes with daily life.

Obsessions are also called intrusive thoughts, and usually of harm coming to the baby. They are usually accompanied by guilt, shame, horror, and hypervigilance. But it could be a sign of OCD if thoughts of getting mugged make you avoid the park, for example, or if concern for your mother’s safety spurs you to call her several times a day. Some mothers, however, experience more significant symptoms associated with postpartum OCD, which are impairing and may interfere with daily functioning.

Such OCD symptoms sometimes occur immediately after the birth of a baby and at times do not appear until later in.

List of related literature:

OCD is another psychiatric disorder that may worsen during the postpartum period.

“Textbook of Medical Psychiatry” by Paul Summergrad, M.D., David A. Silbersweig, M.D., Philip R. Muskin, M.D., John Querques, M.D.
from Textbook of Medical Psychiatry
by Paul Summergrad, M.D., David A. Silbersweig, M.D., et. al.
American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2020

OCD is also diagnosed postpartum and is often characterized as postpartum OCD.

“Diagnostic Interviewing” by Daniel L. Segal
from Diagnostic Interviewing
by Daniel L. Segal
Springer US, 2019

Research suggests that pregnancy and the postpartum phase can be associated with either the start or worsening of OCD.

“The Pregnancy and Postpartum Anxiety Workbook: Practical Skills to Help You Overcome Anxiety, Worry, Panic Attacks, Obsessions, and Compulsions” by Kevin Gyoerkoe, Pamela Wiegartz, Laura Miller
from The Pregnancy and Postpartum Anxiety Workbook: Practical Skills to Help You Overcome Anxiety, Worry, Panic Attacks, Obsessions, and Compulsions
by Kevin Gyoerkoe, Pamela Wiegartz, Laura Miller
New Harbinger Publications, 2009

For some women with no history of OCD, the first episode occurs postpartum.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

It is very important to distinguish between the symptoms of OCD in the postpartum woman and those of postpartum psychosis, because either can involve ideation regarding harming the newborn (Speisman et al., 2011).

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Two weeks postpartum the patient reported resolution of OCD symptoms and through one month follow up showed no reemergence of OCD symptoms.

“Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing: Integrating Psychotherapy, Psychopharmacology, and Complementary and Alternative Approaches” by Joyce J. Fitzpatrick, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN
from Advanced Practice Psychiatric Nursing: Integrating Psychotherapy, Psychopharmacology, and Complementary and Alternative Approaches
by Joyce J. Fitzpatrick, PhD, MBA, RN, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2012

It is also suspected that pregnancy and the postpartum period seem to be a particularly vulnerable time for patients with OCD with either new onset or worsening of symptoms.

“Management of Common Problems in Obstetrics and Gynecology” by T. Murphy Goodwin, Martin N. Montoro, Laila Muderspach, Richard Paulson, Subir Roy
from Management of Common Problems in Obstetrics and Gynecology
by T. Murphy Goodwin, Martin N. Montoro, et. al.
Wiley, 2010

About 3 to 5 percent of women develop postpartum OCD, a condition characterized by obsessive (uncontrollable) thoughts and compulsive rituals to protect the baby.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

After delivery some women seem to develop OCD as a form of postpartum psychiatric disorder (see entry).

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

In addition, obsessivecompulsive symptoms are very common in postpartum depression, and intrusive violent thoughts and contamination concerns are quite common in new mothers without diagnosed psychiatric disorders.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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5 comments

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  • Not talked about enough. This is such an important topic. Personally, I don’t even feel comfortable speaking to a therapist about it cause it’s a stranger

  • I struggled during my last pregnancy and now I’m having another baby and try to take preventative measures this time to prevent intrusive thoughts. Thank you for this information, it needs to be out there.
    Broke down while watching this because I am truly grateful.

  • I had HORRIBLE postpartum anxiety. And then I watched the documentary “When the Bough Breaks” which made me terrified that I was going to go crazy and kill my baby. They didn’t do a good job differentiating between postpartum anxiety and psychosis. Thankfully, I freaked out and told my therapist and she explained the difference between “I’m afraid of hurting my baby” and “I want to hurt my baby.”

  • Postpartum depression/anxiety is really hard to figure it out. I have been drinking herbal formula ” Relaxing mama prenatal/postnatal tea” this tea helps me a lot to deal with my depression

  • OMG like WHY do Talk therapists dont mention that they are not the best to treat OCD…. I remember seeing one for 8 years and kept feeling so so bad <3
    Thank you Windsor! <3