Does Swaddling Increase a Baby’s Chance of SIDS

 

Experts: Swaddling Doesn’t Lessen Chance Of SIDS

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Swaddling May Increase Risk Of SIDS

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Study links swaddling to heightened risk of SIDS

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The Facts About SIDS and Swaddling

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New study says swaddling babies increases risk of SIDS

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Swaddling your baby may increase SIDS risk, new study says

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Swaddling your baby may increase SIDS risk, new study says

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Overall, the analysis showed an increased risk of SIDS when babies were swaddled for “all babies put together,” said co-author Dr. Rachel Y. Moon, division head of general pediatrics at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. There was a slight increase in risk when infants were swaddled and placed on their backs, Moon said. Despite these unsurprising conclusions, media outlets seized upon the finding that swaddled babies placed on their back also have an increased risk of SIDS and that swaddled babies over 6 months. While the overall SIDS risk was increased with swaddling, the risk was even greater when swaddled babies were placed on their stomachs to sleep, Moon said.

Those infants, compared to. Suffocation is possible. If an infant is swaddled with thick blankets, this can lead to overheating, which is another high risk factor for SIDS.

If the infant is swaddled with blankets covering the face, this is yet another risk factor for SIDS. The conclusion is no surprise: The SIDS risk for swaddled infants put to sleep on their stomachs and sides increased by about one-third. To swaddle or not? Swaddling, the act of tightly wrapping an infant from the neck down in a light blanket, is touted by many as a cure-all for fussy babies. While swaddling did increase the risk of SIDS, the biggest increase was found not simply with swaddling and being laid on their backs, but being placed in positions no longer recommended (side and belly), as well as swaddling older infants.

We also need to remember that an increased risk doesn’t necessarily mean a high risk. MONDAY, May 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) If infants are swaddled during sleep, their risk of dying from SIDS is higher, especially if they are placed on their stomachs, new research suggests. As indicated above, prone swaddled infants are at greatly increased risk for SIDS 8. Particularly relevant here, is that two published studies found that swaddling actually reduces SIDS risk when infants sleep in the supine position 8, 10. However, the potential dangers of.

Although the numbers were small, the risk of SIDS from swaddling increased with age (Table 4), with the highest risk associated with infants aged ≥6 months (OR, 2.53 [95% CI, 1.21–5.23]). Overall, the analysis showed an increased risk of SIDS when babies were swaddled for “all babies put together,” said co-author Dr. Rachel Y. Moon, division head of general pediatrics at the.

List of related literature:

Avoid having the infant sleep in a prone position, overheating the infant, or letting the infant sleep with another person; provide a firm sleeping surface; allow no loose blankets, pillows, or stuffed toys in the infant’s bed; avoid smoking during or after pregnancy.

“Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing” by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
from Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing
by Sharon Smith Murray, MSN, RN, C, Emily Slone McKinney, MSN, RN, C
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Avoid allowing the infant to sleep in a prone position, overheating the infant, or letting the infant sleep with another person; provide a firm sleeping surface; allow no loose blankets, pillows, or stuffed toys in the infant’s bed; avoid smoking during or after

“Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Study Guide for Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Swaddling is associated with a small but significant risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) when infants are placed on their backs for sleep, and swaddled infants placed prone have the highest risk of SIDS.

“Merenstein & Gardner's Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care E-Book: An Interprofessional Approach” by Sandra Lee Gardner, Brian S. Carter, Mary I Enzman-Hines, Susan Niermeyer
from Merenstein & Gardner’s Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care E-Book: An Interprofessional Approach
by Sandra Lee Gardner, Brian S. Carter, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

Before 1992 there was mounting epidemiologic evidence from around the world that infants placed in the prone sleeping position were at increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).30-39 Other potential risk factors were soft bedding, swaddling, and recent respiratory or gastrointestinal illnesses.

“Evidence-Based Public Health” by and Director of the Prevention Research Center Ross C. Brownson Professor of Epidemiology, Elizabeth A. Baker Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, Terry L. Leet Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Missouri Kathleen N. Gillespie Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy All at St.Louis University School of Public Health
from Evidence-Based Public Health
by and Director of the Prevention Research Center Ross C. Brownson Professor of Epidemiology, Elizabeth A. Baker Associate Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, et. al.
Oxford University Press, USA, 2002

It is recommended that infants sleep on a firm surface, such as on a safetyapproved crib mattress covered with a fitted sheet without blankets, pillows, wedges, rolls, or toys in their bassinet or crib, since these objects increase the risk of suffocation.

“Netter's Pediatrics E-Book” by Todd Florin, Stephen Ludwig, MD, Paul L. Aronson, Heidi C. Werner
from Netter’s Pediatrics E-Book
by Todd Florin, Stephen Ludwig, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Parents need to know that certain sleep environments (prone sleeping, tobacco smoke exposure, soft bedding, noninfant bed surface, use of certain drugs by the individual sharing the bed with the infant, and thermal stress) can increase the risk for SIDS.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

There are many environmental factors that increase the risk of SIDS, including tummy sleeping, sleeping on soft or loose bedding or with pillows or toys, exposure to tobacco smoke, and being overheated.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Reports of sudden unexpected death in swaddled infants are rare, and risks can be reduced by placing infants supine and discontinuing swaddling as soon as infants attempt to roll over, with further risk reduction achieved by removing soft bedding and bumper pads from the infant’s sleeping environment.36

“Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation” by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
from Smith’s Recognizable Patterns of Human Deformation
by John M. Graham, Jr. MD, ScD, Pedro A. Sanchez-Lara, MD. MSCE
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Swaddling and putting a baby down to sleep in a prone position increases the risk of SIDS.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Quilts and loose bedding increase the risk that the baby’s head is covered, but also of overheating.

“Handbook of Forensic Medicine” by Burkhard Madea
from Handbook of Forensic Medicine
by Burkhard Madea
Wiley, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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4 comments

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  • Doesn’t swaddling restrict blood flow that can lead to oxygen deprivation similar to how a boa constrictor kills its prey (restricting blood flow as opposed to “squeezing” to not allow air intake). How could you not mention this?

  • We swaddled both my girls as babies but only while they were REALLY small, two months or younger. Once they were older they didnt like it. Iris has always been able to self soothe and sleep on her back while sucking a pacifier. Ashlynn didnt like pacifiers and needed to be rocked to sleep on her belly but would be laid down on her back. So far, at 6 years for one and 7 months for thw other, were doing well!

  • Is it possible that the decline in SIDS over the years is not linked with the campaign but with the discovery of causes for infant death? These deaths would then no longer be counted as SIDs. (SIDS is just a fancy way of saying that we don’t know why the child died.)

  • I don’t think swaddling should be done at all. Would you like to be put in a straitjacket? Babies should be able to move their arms and legs freely.