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What Are the Best Postpartum Birth Control Options? Intrauterine Devices (IUDs). IUDs are small, T-shaped devices that are placed into your uterus. Their main job is to Contraceptive Implants.

You can start using the shot, implant, Skyla and Mirena IUDs, and some types of birth control pills (called mini-pills) right after giving birth. You may be able to get an implant or IUD in the hospital or at your postpartum checkup. Combined hormonal methods: Combined hormonal birth control options include birth control pills, vaginal rings and birth control patches.

They differ in how the hormones are distribute. Here are some birth control options for that unique season in your fertility that will help you continue to avoid artificial hormones and IUDs: Lactational Amenorrhea Method (LAM) This is an option for breastfeeding women who have not yet had their first menses, and can be used up to 6 months postpartum. IUDs can be inserted right after a vaginal or cesarean birth or at your first postpartum health care visit. The hormonal IUD releases a small amount of progestin into the uterus and is approved for up to 3 to 6. The most popular forms of birth control in the United States, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, are oral contraception, tubal ligation (having your tubes tied), and condoms.

Birth control is how you prevent pregnancy. There are lots of different birth control options out there. We’re here to help you figure it all out.

Pick what’s important to you to find your best birth control. 12 rows · Estrogen/progestin combined pill, patch or ring. 9%. Must take pill at same time every da. A postpartum birth control plan is of prime importance and is best to nail down a few months before your delivery. Talk to your doctor about the different options available to you with.

Progestin EC (Plan B®One-Step and others) and ulipristal acetate (ella®) 58 94% Ulipristal acetate EC works better than progestin EC if you are overweight Ulipristal acetate EC works better than progestin.

List of related literature:

The other contraceptive options for women who wish to continue breastfeeding include the progestinonly pill, the progestin dermal implant, medroxyprogesterone acetated injection, barrier methods such as condoms or a diaphragm, and natural family planning.

“The Physician Assistant Student’s Guide to the Clinical Year Seven-Volume Set” by Maureen A. Knechtel, MPAS, PA-C
from The Physician Assistant Student’s Guide to the Clinical Year Seven-Volume Set
by Maureen A. Knechtel, MPAS, PA-C
Springer Publishing Company, 2019

Highly effective, nonestrogen, reversible contraceptives that are appropriate for women with medical comorbidities include the IUD (either copper IUD or the levonorgestrel IUD); Depo-Provera; and the single-rod progestin-only implant (Implanon), which is now available in the United States.

“Swanson's Family Medicine Review E-Book” by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
from Swanson’s Family Medicine Review E-Book
by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Barrier methods or contraceptives that contain only progestin (any form of progesterone), such as the progestin IUD (Mirena), Depo-Provera, or progestin only OCs, are also good choices for the older woman.

“Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book” by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, Sharon Smith Murray, Kristine Nelson, Jean Ashwill
from Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book
by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Highly effective, nonestrogen, reversible contraceptives that are appropriate for women with medical comorbidities include the IUD (either copper IUD or the levonorogestrel IUD); Depo-Provera; or the single-rod progestin-only implant (Implanon), which is now available in the United States.

“Swanson's Family Medicine Review” by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
from Swanson’s Family Medicine Review
by Alfred F. Tallia, Joseph E. Scherger, Nancy Dickey
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

The IUD, the implant, and Depo-Provera are the most effective kinds of birth control.

“It's Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health” by Michael Emberley, Robie H. Harris
from It’s Perfectly Normal: Changing Bodies, Growing Up, Sex, and Sexual Health
by Michael Emberley, Robie H. Harris
Candlewick Press, 2014

In an effort to improve options and adherence to contraception, HC has expanded to include a weekly dermal patch (Ortho Evra), a hormonal vaginal contraceptive ring (NuvaRing), and less-androgenic progestins such as desogestrel and drospirenone.

“Current Clinical Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Online” by Cleveland Clinic
from Current Clinical Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Online
by Cleveland Clinic
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Progestin-only contraceptives, such as the mini-pill tablet, injectable medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera, Pharmacia), and levonorgestrel implants, are the hormonal methods of choice when nonhormonal methods are not acceptable.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, Jay D. Iams, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Lesley Frazier
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Modern methods of contraceptives offered included combined low dose pills and progesterone-only pills, IUDs, condoms, spermicides, Depo-Provera (injectables offering three-month protection), Norplant (subdermal implants giving five-year protection), and sterilization procedures, by referral to nearby clinics.

“Girls in Trouble with the Law” by Laurie Schaffner
from Girls in Trouble with the Law
by Laurie Schaffner
Rutgers University Press, 2006

Progestin-only contraceptives, such as the mini-pill tablet, injectable medroxyprogesterone acetate (Depo-Provera), and levonorgestrel implants, are the hormonal methods of choice when nonhormonal methods are not acceptable.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In women who desire contraception, options include combination OCPs, as well as progestin-only methods, such as the Mirena IUD, progestin-only pills, Nexplanon, or Depo-Provera.

“Blueprints Obstetrics & Gynecology” by Tamara Callahan
from Blueprints Obstetrics & Gynecology
by Tamara Callahan
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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13 comments

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  • Unfortunately, I think sex education and education about basic anatomy is pretty poor in this country. As soon as women turn 14 these days, they are complaining that all their friends are on contraceptives. I get to hear that crap all day…

    I wish more women would rely on their nature ovulation cycles because once you figure it out, it’s not that hard to keep tabs on it. Not my words, but talking to women that are open about that kind of method, basically tell me that the majority of women out there are borderline retards for going on the pill. It is actively destroying your body’s natural hormone and ovulation cycles.

  • This video seem to good to be true �� as in the sense that not one of you had at least one negative comment on the variety of birth controls y’all mention like pain or discomfort with the IUD. My experience with Kyleena IUD is more recent and that shit hurt for 4 or five days I had the depo as my first form of BC worst decision ever acne weight gain swelling of my feet I felt like I blew up from not getting a menstrual cycle probably had it 3 time out of the year and 5 months I was on it & but depo was highly affective in not having babies was the only good effect I had but let’s hope my Kyleena IUD does me good If not I’m done with BC and god can me my BC ����‍♀️

  • I used for my hormones and for time birth control. Or right pill helps with my serve migraines and. Periods that made Chronically Anemic����

  • I hate depo i gained so much weight and I want to find a natural birth control but, people recommend daysy which is extremely expensive.

  • I got my Kyleena IUD inserted 7 days ago and I’ve never felt more in control of my body as I do now. I am still scared to see negative side effects appear such as cystic acne and hair loss. However, so far, I am doing great and minimal spottings that do not bother me at all. Every birth control method affects a body differently, so even if a certain contraction method didn’t work out well for someone, it does not mean that it shouldn’t be used by others that can benefit from it. Right now, I would that I am highly satisfied with my decision of getting the Kyleena IUD inserted as it is a hormonal IUD that contains less hormone than the Mirena. The Kyleena only has a total of 19.5 mg of levonorgestrel (which is an artificial hormone similar to progesterone) comparatively to the Mirena that has 52 mg of levonorgestrel. It is also an IUD that is effective for 5 years, so it is great to know that there is nothing to worry about once the IUD is placed. I even planned out to opt for the copper IUD if ever I am experiencing bad hormonal side effects with my Kyleena. The one thing about the copper IUD that scares me out is the increasing amount of pain during menstruation. I already have period cramps on my own without any type of contraception method, so doctors and pharmacists have all told me that the copper IUD worsens the menstrual cramps for most of the women that take it. That was the one thing that made me choose the hormonal IUD over the copper one. Regardless, I am now on a new journey with my IUD and I am excited to see where it will take me and what my experiences with it will be. CROSSING MY FINGERS THAT I DO NOT GET HORMONAL DEPRESSION, HORMONAL CYSTIC ACNE NOR HAIR LOSS OVER THIS AMAZING DEVICE. I don’t want to have to take it out. With this, I want to say #thxbirthcontrol

  • Does Clegenatur Methods really work? I notice lots of people keep on speaking about Clegenatur Methods. But I’m uncertain if it is good enough to have bigger and firmer breast naturally.

  • I’ve been using the low dose combined bill Yaz for many years and find it great, I never had any side effects from it and no weight gain, which was my main concern. My periods are also super short and light. I always use condoms as well unless they get tested

  • Instead of scientists creating new forms of birth control I think they need to improve the pill. I’m so terrified of having health side effects like blood clotting which I have heard happens, but I am also terrified of any sort of insertion so IUD is a no go.

  • i really want to go on some form of birth control but am petrified of gaining weight, it’s making it hard to decide what to go on.

  • Why did lovely with the short hair, who has a hormonal iud, just glaze over the fact that she had her period for a month and a half like it’s no big deal?! I’m currently experiencing this and I feel like it will never end!! I have the copper iud and I’ve had my period for a month with no feels of end in sight. It’s miserable

  • Amazing in 2019 that there are 11 options with differing side effects. Only one for men a condom. I just took my daughter who is on Epilepsy medicine that taking the pill would interfere with, make sure girls you tell your Dr. That information. One reason women’s health care may be the most important.

  • I love how women are so supportive and empowering on this video! Birth control is so important. I’m the same way I had to learn on my own my mom never really talked to me about anything.

  • So I am soon to be married via arranged marriage and I just can’t afford getting pregnant in the first 7 years I just can’t. All these things fuck up your hormones and I am already prone to depression and did use birth control for acne I just couldn’t control my emotions. It made me feel really bad and I just don’t know what to do. I don’t want to gain weight preventing the pregnancy and then gain more weight during the pregnancy. Honestly right now it just feels like I am on the losing end of the deal lol.