Breastfeeding and the development of Food

 

Breastfeeding and Introducing Solids

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When to Start Solid Foods (Nepali) Nutrition Series

Video taken from the channel: Global Health Media Project


 

Ask Summer! Introduction of Solid Foods and BLW

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INTRODUCING SOLID FOODS: A Complete Guide to Feeding Techniques, Nutrition, Allergens & More

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Breast Feeding And Starting Solids

Video taken from the channel: Apple Tree Pediatrics


 

Introduction of Solid Foods-What is New?

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What is a good balance between solid food and breast milk or formula for my baby?

Video taken from the channel: IntermountainMoms


Breastfeeding and breast milk are still very important as your child transitions to solid foods. Experts recommend the continuation of breastfeeding or breast milk along with solid foods for at least the first year. 2. The start of solid foods is not meant to replace breastfeeding. Introducing foods The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6 months.

When you add solid foods to your baby’s diet, continue breastfeeding until at least 12 months. You can continue to breastfeed after 12 months if you and your baby desire. How to start solids: Nurse your baby before offering other foods.

Your milk remains the single most important food in your baby’s diet until his first birthday. Additionally, he is more likely to show interest in new foods if he is not ravenously hungry. At this age, other.

Introducing solid foods while continuing to breastfeed is thought to help protect a baby against developing food allergies and coeliac disease. 3 The exact timing for introducing potentially allergenic foods to a baby’s diet has been a subject of discussion in recent years. UK’s National Health Service (NHS) recommend.

This indicates that there is a potential relationship between introduction of solid foods and the timing of breastfeeding discontinuation.3Many mothers have indicated that their healthcare professional recommended introduction of solids before 6 months, which implies that some primary care providers are not promoting the AAP recommendations.4. Generally, when infants double their birth weight (typically at about 4 months of age) and weigh about 13 pounds or more, they may be ready for solid foods. NOTE: The AAP recommends breastfeeding as the sole source of nutrition for your baby for about 6 months. When you add solid foods to your baby’s diet, continue breastfeeding until at least 12 months.

You can continue to breastfeed. Continuing to breastfeed alongside the introduction of allergenic foods is also thought to help prevent reactions. Your health Exclusive breastfeeding until around six months followed by gradual introduction of solid foods may allow breastfeeding to delay the return of your periods, which in turn helps to maintain your iron levels. If after checking with your health visitor or doctor, you decide to introduce solid foods before 6 months, you should avoid giving your baby certain foods.

These include foods that contain wheat, gluten, nuts, peanuts, peanut products, seeds, liver, eggs, fish, shellfish, cows’ milk and soft or unpasteurised cheese. Breast milk or formula is the only food your newborn needs. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breast-feeding for the first six months after birth.

But by ages 4 months to 6 months, most babies are ready to begin eating solid foods as a complement to breast-feeding or formula-feeding. Your child can begin eating solid foods at about 6 months old. By the time he or she is 7 or 8 months old, your child can eat a variety of foods from different food groups.

These foods include infant cereals, meat or other proteins, fruits, vegetables, grains, yogurts and cheeses, and more.

List of related literature:

Continuing to breastfeed lowers parents’ stress by allowing them to introduce solid foods as a socialization measure, knowing that the mother’s milk continues to provide the bulk of her baby’s nutritional needs from age 6 to 12 months.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends human milk as the exclusive nutrient source for the first 6 months of life, with introduction of solids at this time, and continued breastfeeding until at least the first 12 months postpartum.

“Handbook of Nutrition and Pregnancy” by Carol J. Lammi-Keefe, E.A. Reese, Sarah C. Couch, Elliot Philipson
from Handbook of Nutrition and Pregnancy
by Carol J. Lammi-Keefe, E.A. Reese, et. al.
Humana Press, 2008

Although breastfed babies tend to accept a variety of solid foods well, because of the fact that they already have been introduced to different flavors of food through their mother’s milk, this does not mean that the infant is ready to stop breastfeeding.

“Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book” by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
from Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book
by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

In addition to breast milk or formula, many health care providers recommend the introduction of solid foods after the fifth month.

“Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion” by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
from Journey Across the Life Span: Human Development and Health Promotion
by Elaine U Polan, Daphne R Taylor
F.A. Davis Company, 2019

Breastfeeding should be continued while solid foods are introduced until 12 months of age and beyond, for as long as the mother and child desire.

“The Essential Guide to Fitness” by Rosemary Marchese, Julie Taylor, Kirsten Fagan
from The Essential Guide to Fitness
by Rosemary Marchese, Julie Taylor, Kirsten Fagan
Cengage Learning Australia, 2019

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children be exclusively breastfed for six months, and then, after solid foods are introduced, given breast milk on a continuing basis to a minimum age of twelve months, “and thereafter for as long as mutually desired.”

“Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth” by Boston Women's Health Book Collective, Judy Norsigian
from Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, Judy Norsigian
Atria Books, 2008

The American Dietetic Association recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months and breastfeeding with complementary foods for at least 12 months as the ideal feeding pattern for infants.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Introducing solid foods Explain to the parents that breast milk or formula, along with appropriate vitamin and mineral supplements, is the only food their infant needs until he’s 4 to 6 months old.

“Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice” by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
from Illustrated Manual of Nursing Practice
by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2002

The nurse should explain the problems involved with early introduction of solid foods and encourage parents to wait until the infant is physiologically ready, at 6 months of age.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

For example, one study of breastfeeding attitudes in six Native American communities found that solid food was introduced much earlier than the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends (Horodynski, Calcatera, & Carpenter, 2012).

“Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities” by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
from Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities
by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
Waveland Press, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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