Breastfeeding and also the Let-Lower Reflex

 

Overactive Letdown: What Is It and What to Do About It

Video taken from the channel: The KT Files


 

Breastfeeding Challenges: Managing Overactive Letdown

Video taken from the channel: DIY Breastfeeding


 

I have fast let-down while nursing, and my baby can’t keep up with it. What can I do?

Video taken from the channel: IntermountainMoms


 

Let Down Reflex

Video taken from the channel: Wild and Wise


 

How to Get A Fast Let Down When Breastfeeding

Video taken from the channel: Marla Aycho


 

Breastfeeding and the Let Down Reflex

Video taken from the channel: Parent24


 

Breast feeding and milk let-down

Video taken from the channel: Dr. John Campbell


The breastfeeding let-down reflex, also called the milk-ejection reflex (MER), is an automatic natural reaction that happens in your body as your baby breastfeeds. When your child latches onto your breast and begins to suck, it sends a message to your brain to release the hormones prolactin and oxytocin. The let-down reflex (milk ejection reflex)By sucking at the breast, your baby triggers tiny nerves in the nipple.These nerves cause hormones to be released into your bloodstream.One of these hormones (prolactin) acts on the milk-making tissues.The other hormone (oxytocin) causes the breast to push out or ‘let down’ the milk.The let-down reflex makes the milk in your breasts available to your baby.Cells. What is let down reflex? When you are breastfeeding, your body is producing and storing milk in your breast tissues, ready to feed your baby. When there is breast milk let down, the milk basically travels from the tissues to your nipples before it gets to the baby’s mouth (or a pump if you are pumping).

How fast or how slow the milk flows depends on the let down reflex, making it a vital factor in the. Let down reflex is felt as a tingling sensation when your baby has been sucking at a breast for about 2 minutes. Letdowns generally occur more than once during a breastfeeding session, but most women feel the initial let down. Some women also experience a letdown when they think about their baby or. A milk let down reflex is a natural function, but sometimes it can cause a few breastfeeding problems when the flow of milk becomes too forceful or too slow.

What you need to remember, is that before 6 weeks postpartum, your body is getting accustomed to the needs of your baby and things should start improving; then your baby should also begin to drink more aggressively, which. Think of the letdown reflex as an intricate dance in which you and your baby are partners. Your body responds to input from your baby when they begin to. When a baby starts to suckle, a reflex involving nerves and hormones (a neurohormonal reflex) releases milk from the breast.

This reflex is known as the milk ejection reflex (MER) and is commonly called the “let-down”. If milk is released very forcefully it is sometimes called a fast let-down or an overactive let-down. The let-down reflex, however, can make breastfeeding easier for both you and your baby. “Let-down” is the release of milk from the breast. It’s a normal reflex that occurs when nerves in your.

The let-down reflex, or the milk ejection reflex, is essentially the release of the stored milk in your breasts. In between feedings, your body acts like a factory and continues to manufacture milk and build a supply of milk in your breasts. Not only will your baby receive a good flow of milk as your milk lets down but this reflex will be squeezing the higher fat milk that adheres to the sides of the alveoli down to your baby too.

This higher fat milk is often called ‘hind milk,’ while the first milk your baby drinks is referred to as foremilk.

List of related literature:

After several weeks, it becomes a barely noticeable sensation.The let-down reflex can be inhibited by stress and anxiety; therefore, it is important that you feel good about breast-feeding your baby for your experience to be successful and satisfying.

“Natural Health After Birth: The Complete Guide to Postpartum Wellness” by Aviva Jill Romm
from Natural Health After Birth: The Complete Guide to Postpartum Wellness
by Aviva Jill Romm
Inner Traditions/Bear, 2002

Usually the letdown reflex becomes less noticeable and inappropriate after the early weeks of breastfeeding.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

Pain, anxiety, and insecurity may be hidden reasons for breastfeeding failure through the inhibitions of the let-down reflex.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Once your let-down reflex is consistent (usually by two weeks after delivery), you may feel a pins-and-needles, or tingling, sensation in your breasts when you nurse or pump.

“Mama Glow” by Latham Thomas
from Mama Glow
by Latham Thomas
Hay House, 2012

As many successful breastfeeding women know all too well, the reflex can be operantly conditioned; the smell, sight, and sound can unexpectantly elicit the let-down reflex.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

After breastfeeding has been fully established in the first few weeks, lactating women may begin to feel the strong tingling sensation in the breasts caused by oxytocin release, signaling the let-down reflex.

“Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book” by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
from Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book
by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The let—down reflex is stimulated by a neurogenic reflex, with oxytocin released from the pituitary gland in response to suckling, forcing milk out of the alveoli in the breasts.

“Tabbner's Nursing Care: Theory and Practice” by Gabby Koutoukidis, Gabrielle Koutoukidis, Kate Stainton, Jodie Hughson
from Tabbner’s Nursing Care: Theory and Practice
by Gabby Koutoukidis, Gabrielle Koutoukidis, et. al.
Churchill Livingstone, 2012

This reflex was long thought to be unnecessary, but Dr. Colson found that a newborn uses this reflex to push herself to the breast.

“Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers” by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
from Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers
by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
New Harbinger Publications, 2010

The let-down reflex can also be stimulated by the sight of an infant or the sound of an infant’s cry, and inhibited by maternal pain or stress, or low milk supply.

“Midwifery: Preparation for Practice” by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, Carol Thorogood, Jan Pincombe
from Midwifery: Preparation for Practice
by Sally Pairman, Sally K. Tracy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

This process, often called the let-down reflex, may be accompanied by a tingling sensation in the breast that lets the mother know the infant is receiving milk.

“Discovering Nutrition” by Paul M. Insel, R. Elaine Turner, Don Ross
from Discovering Nutrition
by Paul M. Insel, R. Elaine Turner, Don Ross
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2006

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • *Lactiferous sinus
    I encourage you to read into it more if you are interested

    Ramsay, D. T., Kent, J. C., Hartmann, R. A. and Hartmann, P. E. (2005), Anatomy of the lactating human breast redefined with ultrasound imaging. Journal of Anatomy, 206: 525–534. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7580.2005.00417.x

  • this was very helpful thank you for the tips my son Eli is a month old and im trying to establish a good milk supply plus i want to start storing milk so this video really helped

  • This is interesting thank you. I heard in some instances whereas a mother is not able to breast feed for whatever reasons then goats milk is closest to human milk for babies.

  • HAHA!! Yeah, it can be super embarrassing have a milk stained shirt, but let’s be honest… That’s just beginning of the many embarrassing moments your kids will put you through. I’ll get my revenge in teenage hood FOR SURE!!!

  • When it happens to my baby boy I place the one letting down over a baby bottle so it won’t go to waste! Some times it can be a hole ounce or two saved by doing it this way!