Breastfeeding and also the Flu Vaccine

 

Nurses and Flu Vaccine

Video taken from the channel: American Nurses Association


 

Golden Hour & Breastfeeding Tips During Cold/Flu Season

Video taken from the channel: UnityPoint Health Dubuque


 

Can I get a flu shot if I’m breastfeeding?

Video taken from the channel: IntermountainMoms


 

Is the H1N1 vaccine safe for breastfeeding moms?

Video taken from the channel: Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital


 

Flu vaccine and nursing homes: New results from the National Poll on Healthy Aging

Video taken from the channel: Michigan Medicine


 

Giving the Flu Shot? Here’s 5 Things to Know

Video taken from the channel: Hey Pharmacist


 

Answers to Common Questions about Flu Vaccine Safety

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


Breastfeeding can provide some protection against flu for infants, including children younger than 6 months who cannot receive the flu vaccine. Annual flu vaccination is recommended for all persons aged 6 months and older (except in rare cases), and is particularly important for pregnant women. Additionally, to protect children younger than 6 months of age from flu, persons around the infant (e.g.

The influenza vaccine is considered the safe choice of immunization during pregnancy and breastfeeding. If your baby is six months of age or older, a pediatrician may recommend that they are vaccinated against the flu, as well. “Infants cannot get the influenza vaccine until 6 months of age, so [they] rely on protection both from antibodies the mother passes to their child during the pregnancy and through the breast. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that everyone 6 months of age and older—including pregnant women and women who are breastfeeding—get the flu vaccine each year. If you are pregnant, it is best to get the vaccine early in the flu season (October through May), as soon as the vaccine is available.

Yes, either a flu shot or nasal spray flu vaccine should be given to breastfeeding mothers. There is no risk of harm to a baby if a mother receives a flu vaccination, only a health benefit! • Preventing the flu in mothers can reduce the chance that the infant will be exposed to the flu and get it. The best form of protection (although still not 100%) is flu vaccination which can be undertaken whilst breastfeeding with no risk to the baby. The symptoms of flu usually last for a week. Symptoms develop approximately 4 days after infection.

Ways to try to avoid flu. Although live viruses in vaccines can replicate in the mother, the majority of live viruses in vaccines have been demonstrated not to be excreted in human milk. Inactivated, recombinant, subunit, polysaccharide, and conjugate vaccines, as well as toxoids, pose no risk for mothers who are breastfeeding or for their infants. Can I have a flu vaccine if I’m breastfeeding?

Yes. The vaccine poses no risk to a breastfeeding mother or her baby, or to pregnant women. Is it OK to have the flu vaccine during pregnancy?

Yes. In fact, it’s important to get the flu vaccine if you’re pregnant. Private manufacturers make the flu vaccine and take about six months to produce it. The availability of the flu vaccine depends on when production is completed. But generally, shipments begin sometime in August in the United States.

Doctors and nurses may begin vaccinating people as soon as the flu vaccine is available in their areas. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee, “The Influenza vaccine does not affect the safety of the mothers who are breastfeeding or their infants. Breastfeeding does not adversely affect the immune response and is not a contradiction for vaccination.”.

List of related literature:

There are no reported side effects, nor published contraindications for using influenza virus vaccine during lactation.1,2 Influenza vaccine is now indicated for breastfeeding mothers and their infants by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“Medications and Mothers' Milk 2017” by Dr. Thomas W. Hale, PhD, Dr. Hilary E. Rowe, PharmD
from Medications and Mothers’ Milk 2017
by Dr. Thomas W. Hale, PhD, Dr. Hilary E. Rowe, PharmD
Springer Publishing Company, 2016

Recommended for all women who will be in the second or third trimester of pregnancy during the influenza season; administration of inactivated influenza vaccine is considered safe at any stage of pregnancy and during lactation c.

“Midwifery and Women's Health Nurse Practitioner Certification Review Guide” by Beth Kelsey, Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos
from Midwifery and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner Certification Review Guide
by Beth Kelsey, Jamille Nagtalon-Ramos
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2014

Moreover, breastfeeding is recommended for women infected with novel influenza A (H1N1), regardless of whether they are being treated, because of the advantages of breast milk for the infant’s immune system (10).

“Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk” by Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman, Sumner J. Yaffe
from Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk
by Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman, Sumner J. Yaffe
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011

Breast-feeding is not adversely affected by immunizations in the infant or mother, and lactation is not a contraindication to immunization with any agent.812 Most live viruses from vaccines are not transferred to breast milk.

“Textbook of Therapeutics: Drug and Disease Management” by Richard A. Helms, David J. Quan
from Textbook of Therapeutics: Drug and Disease Management
by Richard A. Helms, David J. Quan
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006

Although most vaccines are compatible with breastfeeding, the practitioner should check each vaccine prior to administration, as some vaccines do pose significant risk to the infant when exposed via breastmilk (Box 5-2) (Hale, 2012).

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • effective in 62%?? what is probability that I will be contracted with flu and required hospitalization? compare it to probability of side effects after flu shot. You will see that flu vaccine is fake.

  • Flu shot, being pretty much useless itself, also makes you more susceptible to all other viruses. It usually contains mercury as well. Think twice before getting or promoting it.